Susannah Clarke

F, b. 1853, d. November 1934
FatherJohn Clarke b. 1820
MotherJemima Sherwood b. 1820, d. 8 Sep 1882
Susannah Vardy
Photograph by Andrew Clark
     Susannah was born in 1853 at London, Middlesex, England.1
She married Alfred Thomas Vardy on 24 December 1870 at Yarram Yarrm, Victoria.2 As of 24 December 1870,her married name was Vardy.3 Susannah Clarke was employed as a Farmers wife.
They celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversery and made note of this in The Argus of 8 January 1921 -"On the 24th December, 1870, at Yarram, by Rev. Henry Moore, Alfred Thomas, second son of late William Vardy, Dorset, England, England, to Susannah, eldest daughter of late John Clarke of Yarram, Present address:- "Home View", Won Wron South Gippsland."
Susannah died in November 1934 at Yarram, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

Alfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
Children

Citations

  1. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, Calculated from Certificate of Willian VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.
  2. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, Willian VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.
  3. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, William VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.

John Clarke

M, b. 1820
     John Clarke was born in 1820 at Willingale, Essex, England.1
He married Jemima Sherwood circa 1841 at Bryanston Square, London, England.2 John Clarke and Jemima Sherwood appeared in the English census of 1851 at Grove Street, Mile End Old Town, Stepney London. He was reported to have the occupation of Wheelwright. No children were listed as living with them at this Census..1 John Clarke and Jemima Sherwood arrived circa 1856 to Victoria.2

Family

Jemima Sherwood b. 1820, d. 8 Sep 1882
Children

Citations

  1. [S299] Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census, https://www.findmypast.com.au/transcript
    John Clarke and Jemina Clarke (nee Sherwood).
  2. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate, Death Certificate; Jemima CLARKE (nee Sherwood); Reg Vic No: 10536/1882.

Jemima Sherwood

F, b. 1820, d. 8 September 1882
FatherThomas Sherwood
MotherSarah Pope
     Jemima Sherwood was also known as Jemima Shearwood. She was born in 1820 at Hackney, London, Middlesex, England.1
She married John Clarke circa 1841 at Bryanston Square, London, England.1 Jemima Sherwood and John Clarke appeared in the English census of 1851 at Grove Street, Mile End Old Town, Stepney London. He was reported to have the occupation of Wheelwright. No children were listed as living with them at this Census..2 Jemima Sherwood and John Clarke arrived circa 1856 to Victoria.1
Jemima died on 8 September 1882 at Yarram Yarram at Alberton Shire, Buln Buln, Victoria. She died after suffering Bronchitis for one year according to her doctor.3,1 She was buried on 10 September 1882 at Yarram Yarram, Buln Buln, Victoria.1 Her married name was Clarke.

Family

John Clarke b. 1820
Children

Citations

  1. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate, Death Certificate; Jemima CLARKE (nee Sherwood); Reg Vic No: 10536/1882.
  2. [S299] Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census, https://www.findmypast.com.au/transcript
    John Clarke and Jemina Clarke (nee Sherwood).
  3. [S255] Death Search Australia, Death Registration BDM Vic online. Vic Reg No: 10536/1882.

Thomas Hull

M, d. 9 May 1938
FatherJames Hull b. c 1828, d. 28 May 1911
MotherIsabella Hollis b. c 1831, d. 23 Nov 1904
Thomas Hull
3rd Jan 1893
     Thomas Hull was born on 15 July 1864 at Preston, Melbourne, Victoria. His was commonly known as Tom.
He married Lydia Vardy on 3 January 1893 at Trinity Church, Yarram, Victoria. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1903 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of grazier and she of home duties. He resided at, at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria, on in 1908. 1. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1909 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of grazier and she of home duties. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1914 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of grazier and she of home duties. He resided at Bungeeluke Nth, at Wycheproof, Victoria, on in 1915. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1916 and listed as living at Wycheproof, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of farmer and she of home duties. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1917 and listed as living at Wycheproof, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of farmer and she of home duties. Thomas was employed at Yarrum as a Farmer at Yarram, Victoria, in June 1918. Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1932 and listed as living at Won Wron, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of farmer. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1936 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of "no occupation" and she of home duties.
Thomas died on 9 May 1938 at Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, from an enlarged Prostate and Cysto-urethro-pyelonephritis, probably as a complication of his "Enlarged Prostate" (cancer?) which he had suffered "for years". at age at an unknown age . His body was interred on 11 May 1938 at The Necropolis, Springvale, Melbourne, Victoria. Lydia Vardy [by Alfred E. Vardy]
The eldest of the family married Thomas Hull a farmer at
Welshpool.
There were two children, Roy (deceased) and Elsie.
Lydia took pity on a small boy named George Frost who had an infected foot and was living in a tent with his father, a navvy working on the building of the South Gippsland Railway line around the turn of the century She and her husband later adopted the boy who was nick-named Daido. He enlisted and was killed in the first world war, aged 19 years.
Tom was keen on horse racing and kept a stable and was noted as a bit of a gambler.
He sold out at Welshpool and purchased a wheat growing property at Wycheproof.
He struck a series of bad seasons and got into financial difficulties.
Lydia purchased a large house at Wanda Road, Caulfield and let sections as flats, where she and her husband with Roy remained till their deaths.
In my younger days when I made visits to the city I often stayed with my Aunt Lydia at Wanda Rd.2

Family

Lydia Vardy b. 7 Nov 1871, d. 6 Jan 1954
Children

Citations

  1. From Roy's enrollment records at Caulfield Grammar.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p5.

Lydia Vardy

F, b. 7 November 1871, d. 6 January 1954
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934

Lydia Vardy - 1893
     Lydia was born on 7 November 1871 at Yarram Yarram, Buln Buln, Victoria. She married Thomas Hull on on 3 January 1893 at the an unknown place at Trinity Church, Yarram, Victoria. As of 3 January 1893,her married name was Hull. Extract from unpublished family history written by Walter E. Vardy 1982: "Alfred Thomas and Susan Vardy - Founders of the Vardy Family in Gippsland"

The eldest of the family married Thomas Hull a farmer at Welshpool. There were two children, Roy (deceased) and Elsie.

Lydia took pity on a small boy named George Frost who had an infected foot and was living in a tent with his father, a navvy working on the building of the South Gippsland Railway line around the turn of the century.

She and her husband later adopted the boy who was nick-named Daido. He enlisted and was killed in the first world war, aged 19 years. Tom was keen on horse racing and kept a stable and was noted as a bit of a gambler.

He sold out at Welshpool and purchased a wheat growing property at Wycheproof.

He struck a series of bad seasons and got into financial difficulties. Lydia purchased a large house at Wanda Road, Caulfield and let sections as flats, where she and her husband with Roy remained till their deaths.

In my younger days when I made visits to the city I often stayed with my Aunt Lydia at Wanda Rd.1



Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1903 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of grazier. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1909 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of grazier. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1914 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of grazier. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1916 and listed as living at Wycheproof, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of farmer. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1917 and listed as living at Wycheproof, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of farmer. Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1924 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties. Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1931 and listed as living at Won Wron, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1936 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of "no occupation". Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1939 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties.
Lydia died on 6 January 1954 at 23 Wanda Road, at Caulfield, Victoria, She died of Carcinoma of both the breast and colon which she had been suffering for 6 to 10 years. at age 82.2 She was buried on 8 January 1954 at Springvale Cemetery, Melbourne.2 Lydia Vardy [by Alfred E. Vardy]
The eldest of the family married Thomas Hull a farmer at
Welshpool.
There were two children, Roy (deceased) and Elsie.
Lydia took pity on a small boy named George Frost who had an infected foot and was living in a tent with his father, a navvy working on the building of the South Gippsland Railway line around the turn of the century She and her husband later adopted the boy who was nick-named Daido. He enlisted and was killed in the first world war, aged 19 years.
Tom was keen on horse racing and kept a stable and was noted as a bit of a gambler.
He sold out at Welshpool and purchased a wheat growing property at Wycheproof.
He struck a series of bad seasons and got into financial difficulties.
Lydia purchased a large house at Wanda Road, Caulfield and let sections as flats, where she and her husband with Roy remained till their deaths.
In my younger days when I made visits to the city I often stayed with my Aunt Lydia at Wanda Rd.3

Family

Thomas Hull d. 9 May 1938
Children

Citations

  1. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History.
  2. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate, Lydia Hull.
  3. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p5.

Margaret Jean Clark

F, b. 27 April 1931, d. 26 June 2021
FatherCharles Follett Clark b. 19 Nov 1893, d. 28 May 1959
MotherElsie Minnie Isobel Hull b. 3 Nov 1896, d. 26 Apr 1987
Margaret Jean Clark
Early
     Margaret was born at King Edward Avenue on 27 April 1931 at Sunshine Hospital, Sunshine.1 She was baptized on 27 April 1931 at St Marks Anglican Church, Sunshine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.2 She lived at 16 Church Street, Leongatha, Victoria. Here they had a cow and an orchard. She was confirmed on 20 August 1944 at Christ Church, Hamilton, Victoria.3 As of 3 January 1953,her married name was Irvine.1
Margaret Jean Clark died on 26 June 2021 at Eventide Lutheran Home, Hamilton, Victoria, at age 90 years, 1 month and 30 days. She died peacefully, in the end, after a time with dementia. She had been in Eventide for six months.4

Citations

  1. [S258] Interview, Margaret Jean Irvire (nee Clark), 3 Oct 2018, From discussion with her.
  2. [S258] Interview, Margaret Jean Irvire (nee Clark), 3 Oct 2018, From her Baptism Certificate.
  3. [S99] Text , Direct from her "Certificate of Confirmation."
  4. [S221] Interview, Andrew Clark, From Phone conversation with Sue Poynton on 27/06/2021.

Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble

M, b. 7 May 1911, d. 15 July 1967
FatherHerbert Joseph Gamble b. 3 Jul 1882, d. 9 Nov 1960
MotherMabel Cairns b. 27 May 1879, d. 8 Jun 1955
     His was commonly known as Russ. Hugh was born on 7 May 1911 at East Brunswick, Melbourne, Victoria. Educated at Scotch College.
Fellow of the Pharmaceutical Society.
Squadron Leader R.A.A.F..
General Manager MAY & BAKER (Aust). In a book "A History of May & Baker 1834-1984" A photo of Russell has the caption " ...... with H.R.J. Gamble, a fellow Director, 1956".
During this year (1929), as a student at Scotch College, Russ was a member of the schools "Dramatic Club".

Hugh was Apprenticed on 25 November 1929 at 280 Bourke Street in Melbourne. He was Indentured by his father to Mr Herbert Eaton Daylesford Stevens, Pharmacist of 280 Bourke Street, Melbourne, to complete a four year Appenticeship in Pharmacy under the Medical Act 1915; The Pharmacy Regulations 1917 & 1925 and administered by the Pharmacy Board. This was completed in January 1934.
Hugh appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1936, when aged 24 years, and listed as living at 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, Melbourne, Victoria. Hugh had a listed occupation of student. He on 22 April 1936.
Newspaper Article - The Argus (Melbourne) Thursday 23/4/1936 -
Gamble—Scott
A charming wedding took place at the Scotch College Chapel last night, when Mavis Maplesden Balfour, eldest daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. W. H. Scott, of 82 Cromer Street, Preston, was married to H. J. Russell, elder son of Mr. and Mrs.W. J. Gamble, of 483 Neerim road, Murrumbeena, by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson.
The bride made a most attractive picture in her gown of Limerick lace mountedon stiff silk, which had been worn by her grandmother on her wedding day.
The close-fitting bodice had pretty bell sleeves, and the very full skirt fell into a train at the back. A tulle cap encircled with pearls was worn on her head and a veil of Limerick lace flowed from the nape of her neck.
The bride, who was given away by her father, was attended by her cousin, Mrs.J. H. Begg, her sister, Miss Lorraine Scott,and by two small girls—Betty Gamble and Helen Scott. They were dressed alike in picturesque frocks of parchment coloured taffeta, with pleated fichus edgingthe bodices, and full graceful skirts. Salmon-pink roses were worn on their dresses and the same flowers formed their becoming wreaths. The two little girls carried baskets of roses, and the two older attendants held period posies of roses. The bridegroom's brother, Mr. Herbert Gamble, acted as best man. After the ceremony a reception was held at 9 Highbury grove, Kew.
Newspaper Article - Table Talk (Melbourne) Thursday 30/4/1936 -
Old World Note At Gamble- Scott Wedding - Miss Mavis Scott Wears her Grandmother's Wedding Frock of Limerick Lace
WHEN she was married to Mr Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble last Wednesday evening, Miss Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott made a very charming bride. She wore her grandmother's wedding gown of real Limerick lace, mounted on stiff rustling silk. The bodice was tightly fitting, and the sleeves were bell shaped, while the skirt had its fullness coming from the waist, which was swathed with a silk belt, embroidered with pearls. A twisted string of pearls was placed round the Juliet cap which held in place her veil of the same Limerick lace as the frock. Her 1830 posy of deep cream roses was in perfect harmony with the Early Victorian character of her ensemble. This wedding was celebrated at the Scotch College Memorial Hall, which was decorated for the occasion with cream and pink dahlias and leaves in lovely autumn hues.
The bride, who is the eldest daughter of Brigadier W. H. Scott and Mrs Scott, 82 Cramer Street, Preston, was attended by Mrs J. H. Begg as matron of honor, Miss L. Scott as bridesmaid and by two tiny trainbearers, Betty Gamble and Helen Scott.
The old-world note of the bride's gown was carried out in their frocks. Each was made of parchment taffetas with a tightly fitting bodice and a very full skirt, a twisted fichu outlined the neckline and awide sash lined with salmon pink encircled the waist. Posies of pink rosebuds were carried and wreaths of these flowers were worn in their hair.
The bridegroom, who is the elder son of Mr and Mrs H. J. Gamble, 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, had his brother, Mr Herbert Gamble, as his best man.
After the ceremony, which was solemnised by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson, a reception was held at 9 Highbury Grove, Kew. Mrs Scott, who, with her husband, received the guests, wore a frock of black velvet made with a matching cape and trimmed with silver lame. Her bouquet was of deep pink dahlias mingled with autumn leaves. Mrs Gamble chose a gown of beige cloque made on simple tailored lines. Her velvet coat was trimmed with fox furs.
. Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble lived in 1938 at Taylor Street, Malvern East, Victoria.1
In The Age of 14th July 1945 there is a report concerning a blaze which burnt down Russell's home in Taylor Street.
The British company May and Baker registered in Melbourne in 1946. Russ was to go on to be a Director for the company as it expanded in Australia. From The Herald Newspaper, Melbourne, on 13 May 1946, p11:
"M And B" Company Registers Here
May and Baker (Australia). Pty. Ltd., chemists and druggists, registered as a "foreign" company in Victoria today, with head ofllce in
Sydney. Capital is £10,000.
Directors: Messrs F. C. Marrington and T. A. Martin. Victorian agent, H. J. R. Gamble, corner Grattan and Lygon Streets, Carlton.

It was reported on 11 December 1951 in The Age (page 6) that Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble had been appointed a Director of May and Baker Pty Ltd. He resided at 6 Gellibrand Street, at Kew, Melbourne, Victoria, on in October 1959. One the 30th April 1962 Bruce Stokes Wainwright, as Trustees to Herbert's Estate, sold 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, the family home, to John Morley and Patricia Shepherd for the sum of $7,000. Mr & Mrs Shepherd paid 1,000 Pound deposit and paid the balance at the rate of 10 Pound per week "which shall include interest" until the 15th June 1969 when the ballance became due. The interest was 7%. Hugh appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1963, now aged 51 years, and listed as living at 6 Gellibrand Street, Kew, Melbourne.
Hugh died on 15 July 1967 at Kew, Melbourne, Victoria, at age 56. He was cremated on 18 July 1967 at Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Melbourne, Victoria.2

Family

Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott b. 25 Apr 1913, d. 24 Mar 2008

Citations

  1. [S283] Directory, Victorian (Sands), 1938, p 1369.
  2. [S226] Springvale botanical cemetery; Gamble, Hugh Joseph Russell; Cremated, 18/07/1967;
    The cremated remains have been collected.

Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott

F, b. 25 April 1913, d. 24 March 2008
FatherBrig. William Henry Scott CMG DSO b. 11 Apr 1881, d. 21 Sep 1960
MotherRosamond Maplesden Carter b. 9 Sep 1889, d. 5 Jan 1940
     Mavis was born on on 25 April 1913 at Wangaratta, Victoria.
# Newspaper Photo - Table Talk (Melbourne) Thursday 26/11/1931 -
Miss Mavis Scott, eldest daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. W. H. Scott, who was a debutante at the United Service Institution Ball, held at the Plaza, St. Kilda, recently.
She married Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble on 22 April 1936.
Newspaper Article - The Argus (Melbourne) Thursday 23/4/1936 -
Gamble—Scott
A charming wedding took place at the Scotch College Chapel last night, when Mavis Maplesden Balfour, eldest daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. W. H. Scott, of 82 Cromer Street, Preston, was married to H. J. Russell, elder son of Mr. and Mrs.W. J. Gamble, of 483 Neerim road, Murrumbeena, by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson.
The bride made a most attractive picture in her gown of Limerick lace mountedon stiff silk, which had been worn by her grandmother on her wedding day.
The close-fitting bodice had pretty bell sleeves, and the very full skirt fell into a train at the back. A tulle cap encircled with pearls was worn on her head and a veil of Limerick lace flowed from the nape of her neck.
The bride, who was given away by her father, was attended by her cousin, Mrs.J. H. Begg, her sister, Miss Lorraine Scott,and by two small girls—Betty Gamble and Helen Scott. They were dressed alike in picturesque frocks of parchment coloured taffeta, with pleated fichus edgingthe bodices, and full graceful skirts. Salmon-pink roses were worn on their dresses and the same flowers formed their becoming wreaths. The two little girls carried baskets of roses, and the two older attendants held period posies of roses. The bridegroom's brother, Mr. Herbert Gamble, acted as best man. After the ceremony a reception was held at 9 Highbury grove, Kew.
Newspaper Article - Table Talk (Melbourne) Thursday 30/4/1936 -
Old World Note At Gamble- Scott Wedding - Miss Mavis Scott Wears her Grandmother's Wedding Frock of Limerick Lace
WHEN she was married to Mr Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble last Wednesday evening, Miss Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott made a very charming bride. She wore her grandmother's wedding gown of real Limerick lace, mounted on stiff rustling silk. The bodice was tightly fitting, and the sleeves were bell shaped, while the skirt had its fullness coming from the waist, which was swathed with a silk belt, embroidered with pearls. A twisted string of pearls was placed round the Juliet cap which held in place her veil of the same Limerick lace as the frock. Her 1830 posy of deep cream roses was in perfect harmony with the Early Victorian character of her ensemble. This wedding was celebrated at the Scotch College Memorial Hall, which was decorated for the occasion with cream and pink dahlias and leaves in lovely autumn hues.
The bride, who is the eldest daughter of Brigadier W. H. Scott and Mrs Scott, 82 Cramer Street, Preston, was attended by Mrs J. H. Begg as matron of honor, Miss L. Scott as bridesmaid and by two tiny trainbearers, Betty Gamble and Helen Scott.
The old-world note of the bride's gown was carried out in their frocks. Each was made of parchment taffetas with a tightly fitting bodice and a very full skirt, a twisted fichu outlined the neckline and awide sash lined with salmon pink encircled the waist. Posies of pink rosebuds were carried and wreaths of these flowers were worn in their hair.
The bridegroom, who is the elder son of Mr and Mrs H. J. Gamble, 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, had his brother, Mr Herbert Gamble, as his best man.
After the ceremony, which was solemnised by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson, a reception was held at 9 Highbury Grove, Kew. Mrs Scott, who, with her husband, received the guests, wore a frock of black velvet made with a matching cape and trimmed with silver lame. Her bouquet was of deep pink dahlias mingled with autumn leaves. Mrs Gamble chose a gown of beige cloque made on simple tailored lines. Her velvet coat was trimmed with fox furs.
. As of 22 April 1936, her married name was Gamble.

Mavis appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1937 and listed as living at 4 Taylor Street, East Malvern, Melbourne. Mavis appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1963 and listed as living at 6 Gellibrand Street, Kew, Melbourne. Mavis had a listed occupation of Home Duties and he of Director.
Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott died on 24 March 2008 at Melbourne, Australia, at age 94. She was cremated on 28 March 2008. The cremated remains have been collected.1

Family

Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble b. 7 May 1911, d. 15 Jul 1967

Citations

  1. [S226]

Susanna Beer

F, b. 18 May 1834, d. 15 October 1837
FatherJames Beer b. 2 May 1809, d. 27 Nov 1877
MotherSusanna Follett b. 23 Feb 1813, d. 19 Jul 1862
     Susanna was born on 18 May 1834 at West Teignmouth, Devon, England. Her father, James Beer, is recorded as being a "Whitesmith" at this time..1
Susanna died on 15 October 1837 at St.Paul at Exeter, Devon, England, at age 3.

Citations

  1. [S312] Plymouth & West Devon Record Office, Devon Baptisms.

James John Beer

M, b. 25 January 1836, d. 24 December 1903
FatherJames Beer b. 2 May 1809, d. 27 Nov 1877
MotherSusanna Follett b. 23 Feb 1813, d. 19 Jul 1862
     James was born St Pauls on 25 January 1836 at Exeter, Devon, England. He immigrated with his parents James Beer and Susanna Follett on 24 September 1839 at Port Adelaide, South Australia; aboard the "Recovery" with his wife, son and daughter, four months after leaving London.

He married Eleanor Clark on 11 March 1856 at Adelaide, South Australia. Extract from "THYRA DISTRICT CENTENARY" booklet published 1976.
Among the pioneers of the district was James John Beer who selected land in August 1876. Coming from Devon, England, as a boy, he sailed with his family from Plymouth; the name which he was to give his selection at Bunnaloo.
They originally settled at Adelaide, S.A., where James' father, a blacksmith, performed work on the stripper which was to revolutionise the wheat industry. James travelled to Victoria during the gold rush and farmed at Tabilk and Tylden. He married Elenor Clark, members of whose family selected land adjoining at Bunnaloo. We are told that scrub was so thick at the time that the women tied pieces of cloth to it to enable them to find their way between the homes which were only half a mile apart. Odd plants of this scrub persist on the property today.
James John Beer and Elenor Clark were married in Adelaide in 1856, and their first child, Lucy, was born there the following year. James John and Elenor moved to Victoria with the rest of their families, and they were living at Tylden when their second child was born in 1859.
While they were living at Tylden, the Beers were involved in the Wesleyan Church, for who James John acted as a local preacher. In 1873 James John and Elenor purchased land at Tabilk, where their eighth and last child was born, but she lived for less than three months. It was while they were at Tabilk that their son Henry Alfred contracted typhoid fever and died in 1875.
After James John and his son Albert, selected land at Bunnaloo on the 31 August 1876, the Beer and Clark families moved to NSW. John Clark had also selected land at Bunnaloo. James John named his property "Plymouth", after his place of birth and the port in England, from which he had sailed as a small child.
The Beers were soon involved in district affairs, especially the Bible Christian Church, for whom James John served as a lay preacher. The Beers opened their home as a meeting place, and James John rode or walked many miles to conduct services.
In a letter, dated 4 September 1879, to the Council of Education, the residents of Bunnaloo/Thyra requested that the teacher, who had been conducting a private school in the district, be appointed to the first Government school which was about to be opened. Jas J.Beer was one of the signatories to the letter.
When Elenor's health began to decline, James John decided to move back to a cooler climate of Kyneton. They were living in Urquhart Street, Castlemaine, when Elenor died on the 3 October 1895. She was buried at the Campbells Creek Cemetery. James John returned to live with his family at Bunnaloo and Echuca, moving from one to another. On the 19 July 1899, he purchased the S.S. Elizabeth and a barge for £400.
James John was at his son Rupert's home in High Street, Echuca, when he died on the 24 December 1903. He was buried in the Moama Cemetery.1 He witnessed an unknown person 's burial on 23 August 1884 at Moama Cemetery, Moama, New South Wales. James was employed, as a farmer. An unknown person.
James died on 24 December 1903 at High Street at Echuca, Victoria, of Bright's Disease at age 67. Extract from "Echuca and Moama advertiser Tuesday, December 1903"


OBITUARY

Mr J. J. BEER

Just before midnight on Christmas eve Mr James J Beer, father of our highly respected townsman, Mr R E Beer, passed quietly away after an illness extending over six months, the last two months being confined to his bed. The end had been anticipated for some time, the sufferer having been under Drs, Eking and Kelly for treatment of Bright's disease. The deceased gentleman was a colonist of 64 years, being one of the pioneers of South Australia. He was born in Devonshire, England and sailed with his parents for Australia when three years old. The family landed in Adelaide, which was then only a few canvas tents, and his father, a lock land bright-smith by trade, finding no opening in "canvas town" for such a trade, turned his attention to the blacksmithing business, which he followed with varying success for many years, and his young and only son, James assisted in the business from the time he was old enough to stand on a box to blow the bellows. He claims later on to have made the ironwork for the first successful stripper that ever worked in South Australia, or any other part of the world. This machine was pushed from behind by two bullocks. A good deal of their trade at that time consisted of shoeing, or, as they called it, "cuing" bullocks. As a child, with his parents, he witnessed the landing of the first horse in Adelaide. He was amongst the few at the time of memorable famine in Adelaide, and his father often told the story of the first flour miller coming to him and buying a bag of shrivelled wheat that had been kept for fowls feed, and paying him one guinea per bushel for it, and getting up steam at the mill for the express purpose of grinding that one bag of wheat. A ship laden with flour arrived at port just in time to save the people from starvation. Later on Mr Beer, with his father, uncle and cousin, came over to Victoria, overland, via 90 mile desert, with two bullocks in a dray, and tried their luck for some time on the Fryer's Creek diggings, after which he bought land in Clover's Forest (Tylden) Kyneton district, where they combined farming with their old business, blacksmithing. It is also said that Mr Jas. J Beer bought the first back delivery reaping machine ever delivered in Victoria. Mr Beer and his father also bought a steam threshing machine with which they were very successful in the early Goulburn and Kyneton districts. During his 15 years residence in Tylden he was connected with the Wesleyan denomination and a local preacher, taking as many as 20 services during some quarters and riding and sometimes walking many miles to conduct services. He used to go and take his appointment whether it rained or shined, as he said it was better for him to go and be disappointed at there being no congregation than for the congregation to go and be disappointed at there being no preacher. He then had the satisfaction that he had done his duty, whether the people came in the rain to hear him or not, and thus in that wet climate he had many long cold and wet rides, which he did cheerfully for the Master's cause. He went from Tylden to Tabilk, where he lived for three years and was on the preachers' plan again of the Wesleyan Church, after which he came and selected ground at Bunaloo, NSW, about 30 years ago, being on e of the first to settle in that district. He threw his house open for religious services and started preaching the Gospel all over that district holding services alternately in different houses in the district. Soon after the Bible Christian denomination opened up what is now known as the Wamboota circuit, and Mr Beer joined that church, and was actively engaged in the work for about 12 years, being circuit steward up to the time he left the district and went to Kyneton with his late wife for the benefit of her health, where he again joined the Wesleyan Church and was on the plan as local preacher for several years. Leaving there, he went to Castlemaine, where he lived until his wife died - 8 years ago. Since that time he had been living alternately with his married sons and daughters. He was closely connected with the local Bible Christian Church until the Methodist union took place, and he then threw in his lot with the united Methodists, with whom he was associated up to the time of his death. He was a local preacher up to about a year ago, when he had to abandon the work owing to the failure of his health. He was an active member of the Christian Endeavour Society, in which he took great interest, and it was a cause for great regret to him when his health broke down, rendering him unable to attend the meetings. By his kind and homely manner he gained for himself the highest esteem of all, both young and old, with whom he came in contact. He never entered upon public life outside the church, preferring rather to live a quiet, humble life. He will be greatly missed in church circles, as he was looked upon as a man with a great deal of experience in church matters. His age at the time of his death was 67 years and 11 months. He leaves a grown up family of two daughters and four sons to mourn their loss, who recognise that they have in him lost a good father and a wise counsellor.
. His body was interred on 26 December 1903 at Moama Cemetery, Moama, New South Wales. His obituary in the
The Riverine Herald (Echuca, Vic.)
reads as: MR. J. J. BEER.
Just before midnight on Christmas eve Mr. James J. Beer, father of our highly respected townsman, Mr. R. E. Beer, passed quietly away after an illness extending over six months, the last two months being confined to his bed. The end had been anticipated for some time, the sufferer having been under Drs. Eakins and Kelly for treatment of Bright's disease. The deceased gentleman was a colonist of 64 years, being one of the pioneers of South Australia. He was born in Devonshire, England, and sailed with his parents for Australia when three years old. The family landed in Adelaide, which was then only a few canvas tents, and his father, a lock and bright-smith by trade, finding no opening in "canvas town " for such a trade, turned - his attention to the blacksmithing business, which he followed with varying success for many years, and his young and only son, James, assisted in the business from the times he was old enough to stand on a box to blow the bellows. He claims later on to havo mado the ironwork for the first successful stripper that over worked in South Australia, or any other part of the world. This machino was pushed from behind by two bullocks. A good deal of their trade at that time, consisted of shoeing, or, as they called it, " cueing" bullocks. As a child, with his parents, he witnessed the landing of the first horse in Adelaide. He was amongst the few at the time of memorable famine in Adelaide, and his father often told the story of the first flour miller coming to him and buying a bag of shrivelled wheat that had been kept for fowls' feed, and paying him one guinea per bushel for it, and getting up steam at the mill for the express purpose of grinding that one bag of wheat. A ship laden with flour arrived at port just in time to save the people from starvation. Later on Mr. Beer, with his father, uncle and cousin, came over to Victoria, overland, via 90 mile desert, with
two bullocks in a dray, and tried their luck for some time on the Fryer's Creek diggings, after which he bought land in Clover's Forest (Tylden) Kyneton district, where they combined farming with their old business, blacksmithing. It is also said that Mr. Jas. J. Beer bought the first back delivery reaping machine ever delivered in Victoria. Mr. Beer and his father also bought a steam threshing machine, with which they were very successful in the early Goulburn and Kyneton districts. During his 15 years residence in Tylden he was connected with the Wesleyan denomination, and a local preacher, taking as many as 20 services during some quarters and riding and sometimes walking many miles to conduct services. He used to go and take his appointment whether it rained or shined, as he said it was better for him to go and be disappointed at there being no congregation than for the congregation to go and be disappointed at there being no preacher. He then had the satisfaction that he had done his duty, whether the people came in the rain to hear him or not, and thus in that wet climate he had many long cold and wet rides, which he did cheerfully for the Master's cause. He went from Tylden to Tabilk, where he, lived for three years, and was on the preachor's plan again of the Weslyan Church, after which he came and selected ground at Bunaloo, N.S.W., about 30 years ago, being one of the first to settle in that district. He threw his house open for religious services and started preaching the Gospel all over that district, holding services alternately in different farm houses in tho district. Soon after the Bible Christian denomination opened up what is now known as the Wamboota circuit, and Mr. Beer joined that church, and was actively engaged in the work for about 12 years, being circuit steward up to the time he left the district and went to Kyneton with his late wife for the benefit of her health, where he again joined the Wesleyan Church and was on the plan as local preacher for several years. Leaving there, he went to Castlemaine, where he lived until his wife died-eight years ago. Since that time he had been living alternately with his married sons and daughters. He was closely connected with the local Bible Christian Church until the Methodist union, took place, and he then threw in his lot with the united Methodists, with whom he was associated up to the time of his death. He was a local preacher up to about a year ago, when he had to abandon the work owing to the failure of his health. He was an active member of the Christian Endeavour Society, in which he took great interest, and it was a cause for great regret to him when his health broke down, rendering him unable attend the meetings. By his kind and homely manner he gained for himself the highest esteem of all, both young and old, with whom he came in contact. He never entered upon public life outside the church, preferring rather to live a quiet, humble life. He will be greatly missed in church circles, as he was looked upon as a man with a great deal of experience in church matters. His age at the time of his death was 67 years and 11 months. He leaves a grown-up family of two daughters and four sons to mourn their loss, who recognise that they have in him
lost a good father and a wise counsellor.2

Family

Eleanor Clark b. 6 Nov 1835, d. 3 Oct 1895
Children

Citations

  1. [S63] Durrant, Not All Beer & Skittles , p5.
  2. [S319] Newspaper from Trove , "MR. J. J. BEER." The Riverine Herald (Echuca, Vic. : Moama, NSW : 1869 - 1954; 1998 - 2002) 29 December 1903: 2. Web. 29 May 2021 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article115055805>.

William Clark

M, b. 19 October 1834, d. 22 November 1874
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     He was christened on 19 October 1834 at Heage, Derby, England. William was born on 19 October 1834 at Heage, Derby, England. He immigrated with his parents John and Mary on 6 June 1849 at Port Adelaide, South Australia; The Dorothy, a ship of 488 tons, had originally left Plymouth on 4th Mar before reaching Port Adelaide. John and family travelled this distance as steerage passengers before leaving the ship in Adelaide. From here the Dorothy left for Melbourne arriving there on July 29 after leaving Adelaide on the 21st.
The South Australian Register on Sat 9th June 1849, p4: "Wednesday, June 6 The barque Dorothy, 488 tons, Moody, master, from London. Passengers— Mr Jonas M Myers, Mr Richard Baker Aldersey, wife. and seven children, Mr William Montgomery, wife, and three children. Mr John Rule, Miss Sarah Rule, in the cabin.
Messrs John Joseph Hail, Richard Pirkins, John Moseler Smith, Miss Ellen Scott, Mr William Stewart, in the intermediate. Richard Wm. Lerrett, wife, and two children. John Archer, wife, and child, Wm. Barnes and wife, Henry Rugless, wife, and two children, Henry S Rugless and wife, George Lee and wife, Thomas Goodman, Maria Williams and son, Patrick Gallaway, wife, and three children. James William Bailey, John Robertson, Thos Hitherington, Eliza Barnett, Philip Larritt. William Mason, wife, and child, Robert Torlmer, wife, and two children (Walter, aged I6 years, was drowned at sea, 2nd June). William Brewer, wife, and child, James Brown and wife, Margaret Humbut, Elizabeth Fisher, James Hawkins and two children, John Turner, wife, and five children, Charles Swift, wife, and four children, John Clarse [Clark]. wife, and seven children, Eleanor Slater [nee Frith], Mary Raw Hs. Joseph Fogg. Charles George Webb, Mary Ann Kerby, Geo Diggins. John Grummedge, Harstham Hogg, George Peter Hammond, wife, and three children. Jane Barnes, Thomas Thacker, John Rawson. Thomas Tyler, wife, and eight children, John Stock, John Symes Avery, in the steerage."1

He married Jane Maria Cocking on 31 January 1855 at Brighton, South Australia.
William died on 22 November 1874 at Baynton, Victoria, fractured skull at age 40.

Family

Jane Maria Cocking b. 10 Jan 1836, d. 1897
Children

Citations

  1. [S99] Text , "SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE." South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) 9 June 1849: p4. Web. 22 Dec 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50246245>.

Samuel Clark

M, b. 1842, d. 11 January 1915
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     Samuel was born in 1842 at Derbyshire, England. He was baptized on 17 December 1843 at Anglican service, Heage, Derby, England.1
He married Mary Ryan at Victoria.
Samuel Clark died on 11 January 1915 at Wanalta, Victoria. He died at age 75 years from Chronic disease of the lungs and heart apnea which had been suffering for at least 1 year.2 He was buried on 11 January 1915 at Colbinabbin Cemetery, Victoria.

Family

Mary Ryan
Children

Citations

  1. [S314] Index (c) IRI. Used by permission of FamilySearch Intl, Derby Birtha and Baptisms, Samuel Clark, Baptism, 17 Dec 1843.
  2. [S196] Australian Certificate. Samuel Clark; Reg Vic No: 2988 (D).

Eleanor Clark

F, b. 6 November 1835, d. 3 October 1895
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     She was commonly known as Eleanor. Eleanor was born on 6 November 1835 at Belper, Derby, England. She immigrated with her parents John and Mary on 6 June 1849 at Port Adelaide, South Australia; The Dorothy, a ship of 488 tons, had originally left Plymouth on 4th Mar before reaching Port Adelaide. John and family travelled this distance as steerage passengers before leaving the ship in Adelaide. From here the Dorothy left for Melbourne arriving there on July 29 after leaving Adelaide on the 21st.
The South Australian Register on Sat 9th June 1849, p4: "Wednesday, June 6 The barque Dorothy, 488 tons, Moody, master, from London. Passengers— Mr Jonas M Myers, Mr Richard Baker Aldersey, wife. and seven children, Mr William Montgomery, wife, and three children. Mr John Rule, Miss Sarah Rule, in the cabin.
Messrs John Joseph Hail, Richard Pirkins, John Moseler Smith, Miss Ellen Scott, Mr William Stewart, in the intermediate. Richard Wm. Lerrett, wife, and two children. John Archer, wife, and child, Wm. Barnes and wife, Henry Rugless, wife, and two children, Henry S Rugless and wife, George Lee and wife, Thomas Goodman, Maria Williams and son, Patrick Gallaway, wife, and three children. James William Bailey, John Robertson, Thos Hitherington, Eliza Barnett, Philip Larritt. William Mason, wife, and child, Robert Torlmer, wife, and two children (Walter, aged I6 years, was drowned at sea, 2nd June). William Brewer, wife, and child, James Brown and wife, Margaret Humbut, Elizabeth Fisher, James Hawkins and two children, John Turner, wife, and five children, Charles Swift, wife, and four children, John Clarse [Clark]. wife, and seven children, Eleanor Slater [nee Frith], Mary Raw Hs. Joseph Fogg. Charles George Webb, Mary Ann Kerby, Geo Diggins. John Grummedge, Harstham Hogg, George Peter Hammond, wife, and three children. Jane Barnes, Thomas Thacker, John Rawson. Thomas Tyler, wife, and eight children, John Stock, John Symes Avery, in the steerage."1

She married James John Beer on 11 March 1856 at Adelaide, South Australia. As of 11 March 1856,her married name was Beer.
Eleanor died on 3 October 1895 at Urquhart Street at Castlemaine, Victoria, at age 59.2 She was buried at Castlemaine General Cemetery, Campbells Creek, Castlemaine, Victoria.2,3

Family

James John Beer b. 25 Jan 1836, d. 24 Dec 1903
Children

Citations

  1. [S99] Text , "SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE." South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) 9 June 1849: p4. Web. 22 Dec 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50246245>.
  2. [S63] Durrant, Not All Beer & Skittles , p5.
  3. [S285] "Billion Graves". <unknown cd3>

Robert Troupe Moodie Clark

M, b. 19 May 1849, d. 26 July 1916
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     Robert Troupe Moodie Clark was also known as Robert Troop Moody Clark. Robert was born at transit, on the ocean, en route to Australia on 19 May 1849. He was born on board the ship "Dorothy" on its way to Port Adelaide, South Australia. Hence his birth was recorded in Adelaide on his parents landfall. Robert Troupe Moodie Clark was named after the ship's Master, Robert Troupe Moodie..1 He immigrated on 6 June 1849 to Adelaide, South Australia.2 He was baptized on 10 June 1849 at St Paul's Church, Port Adelaide, South Australia.3 Robert appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1903 and listed as living at Warrenwood, Hay, New South Wales. Robert had a listed occupation of Boundary Rider.
Robert Troupe Moodie Clark died on 26 July 1916 at Hay, New South Wales, at age 67. He was described as a Labourer but also an Invalid Pensioner so must have sufferred some disease or accident in later life. He died from odema of his failing heart as he had had "valvular heart disease" for about 17 years according to his doctor, Dr J. W. O'Brien. Doctor O'Brien last saw him on the 11th of July. His wife Esther was the informant listed on his Death Certificate. He had spent 7 years in South Australia, 14 years in Victoria and the remaining 45 years in NSW.

Citations

  1. [S313] Trading as the South Australian Genealogy & Heraldry Society Inc © Genealogy SA and www.genealogysa.org.au, South Australia Births, Robert Troupe Moodie Clark, SA Reg No: 2/161.
  2. [S195] The Argus, The Argus, Mon 30 July 1849 p2.
  3. [S99] Text , Ancestry.com. Australia, Births and Baptisms, 1792-1981 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
    Original data: Australia, Births and Baptisms, 1792-1981. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013.

Mary Anne Clark

F, b. 1847, d. 1920
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     Mary was born in 1847 at Staffordshire, England.
She married John Moore Chanter on 16 November 1863.
Mary died in 1920 at Caulfield, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

John Moore Chanter b. c 1845, d. 1931
Children

George Clark

M, b. 1841, d. 1910
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     George was born in 1841.
He married Celia Chanter in 1865 at Victoria.
George died in 1910 at Ballaarat, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

Celia Chanter d. 1922
Children

Peter Clark

M, b. 1845, d. 1907
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
     His was commonly known as Peter. Peter was born in 1845 at Derbyshire, England.
He married Isabella Morton Paton in 1870 at Victoria. Peter Clark was widowed with the death of Isabella Morton Paton in 1875 at Victoria; I don't have her certificate but just by coincidence she may have died due to complications of the birth of her daughter.
He married Hannah Shepherdson in 1876 at Victoria.
Peter died in 1907 at Kyabram, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family 1

Isabella Morton Paton b. c 1853, d. 1875
Children

Family 2

Hannah Shepherdson b. c 1857, d. 1888
Children

John Chanter

M
     He married Elizabeth Moore.

Family

Elizabeth Moore
Children

Elizabeth Moore

F
     She married John Chanter.

Family

John Chanter
Children

Jane Maria Cocking

F, b. 10 January 1836, d. 1897
FatherRichard Cocking
MotherMary Rich
     Jane was born on 10 January 1836 at New York, USA.
She married William Clark on 31 January 1855 at Brighton, South Australia.
Jane died in 1897 at the local Hospital, Kyneton, Dalhousie, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

William Clark b. 19 Oct 1834, d. 22 Nov 1874
Children

John Moore Chanter

M, b. circa 1845, d. 1931
FatherJohn Chanter
MotherElizabeth Moore
     John was born circa 1845.
He married Mary Anne Clark on 16 November 1863. He witnessed John Clark's death on 22 August 1884 at Moama, New South Wales.
John died in 1931 at Caulfield, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

Mary Anne Clark b. 1847, d. 1920
Children

Celia Chanter

F, d. 1922
FatherJohn Chanter
MotherElizabeth Moore
     Celia's name is variously spelt CELIA, CECILIA and SELAH on the Birth entries for her children.
She married George Clark in 1865 at Victoria.
Celia died in 1922 at Prahran Melbourne Victoria at age at an unknown age .

Family

George Clark b. 1841, d. 1910
Children

Isabella Morton Paton

F, b. circa 1853, d. 1875
FatherJohn Paton
MotherIsabella Morton
     Isabella was born circa 1853 at Fife, Scotland.
She married Peter Clark in 1870 at Victoria.
Isabella died in 1875 at Victoria I don't have her certificate but just by coincidence she may have died due to complications of the birth of her daughter. at age at an unknown age . She was buried in 1875 at Echuca Cemetery, 45 Hansen Street, Echuca, Victoria. From the cemetery burial record she is listed as being 22 years old.

Family

Peter Clark b. 1845, d. 1907
Children

Hannah Shepherdson

F, b. circa 1857, d. 1888
FatherJohn Shepherdson
     Hannah's surname may have been "Schecterdson". Hannah was born circa 1857.
She married Peter Clark in 1876 at Victoria.
Hannah died in 1888 at Arcadia, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

Peter Clark b. 1845, d. 1907
Children

William Vardy

M, b. 17 January 1874, d. 1970
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934

William Vardy - circa 1920
     His was commonly known as Will. William was born on 17 January 1874 at Yarram Yarram, Buln Buln, Victoria.1 William Vardy
Married Janet Cummings about 1900. Their family was two sons Lloyd and Leonard.
When I first remember him I was a small boy during the first world war and he and his family had a dairy farm at Carrajung South. Some times of a Sunday father would harness the horse to the jinker and we would all go up the winding road to Uncle Will's place for the day.
He sold the Carrajung property in the early twenties and farmed a property at Jack River for some years: and then with his two sons moved to a larger property near Yarram known as Sweeneys. He retired to Yarram in the early depression years. His first wife Janet passed away 1939. He remarried a widow Mrs Casbolt and lived to the ripe old age of almost 96 years passing away a few weeks before his birthday. He was a very active man of sober habits and did not smoke. His second wife predeceased him by a few months.2
He married Janet Cummings in 1901.3,4
He married Mabel Emma Lucas after 1939.
William died in 1970 at Yarram, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family 1

Janet Cummings d. 1939
Children

Family 2

Mabel Emma Lucas b. 1878, d. 1969

Citations

  1. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, Willian VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History.
  3. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p.7.
  4. [S147] Marriage Record, Vardy - Cummings, Vic Reg No: 5363/1901.

Alice Vardy

F, b. 22 April 1876, d. 1976
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934

Alice Vardy - circa 1920
     Alice was born on 22 April 1876 at Yarram, Victoria.1 Alice Vardy
Married Charles Smith of Yarram when she was 20 in 1896. The family four girls - Gladys (Mrs Balhorn Deceased) Mavis (Mrs Odgers) Dorothy (Mrs Levings) and Alice (Mrs Les Wynne).
Her husband Charlie was a boot maker in the town and before the first world war employed up to seven men making boots mainly for the farming people. He also operated a retail shoe shop for a while. Alice lived in the same house in Commercial Rd, Yarram where she was taken as a bride all her married life. She, like her sisters was tall slender and dignified and a meticulous house keeper. Her home was the meeting place of her brothers on their weekly visits to the town where family matters were often discussed over a cup of tea.
Aunt Alice lived 13 years after the death of Uncle Charlie in 1963 and passed away just a few weeks before her 100th birthday in 1976.
She lived with and was cared for by her youngest daughter Alice after the death of Charlie and no doubt the care she received helped to make the attainment of such a long life possible. Uncle Charlie was an industrious man and a keen fisherman and sportsman. My earliest memories of him was my mother driving us children to the beach near St Margaret Island in a horse and jinker where he took us all across to the Island in a row boat.2

She was a witness at Thomas Hull and Lydia Vardy's wedding on 3 January 1893 at Trinity Church, Yarram, Victoria.
She married Charles Thomas Smith in 1896.
Alice died in 1976 at Yarram, Victoria, at age at an unknown age .

Family

Charles Thomas Smith
Child

Citations

  1. [S192] Vic BDM search , Reg Vic No: 13204 in 1876.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History.

Sarah Vardy

F, b. 5 January 1878, d. 5 March 1905
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934
     Sarah was born on 5 January 1878 at Yarram, Victoria.1
Sarah died on 5 March 1905 at Yarram, Buln Buln, Victoria, at approximately 27 years and 2 months. According to an interview with my grandmother Elsie Clark, "Sarah was a nurse at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and was home for a holiday. There was a dance to which she wished to go however she had a boil on her face. To try to hide it she applied a powder and a hot water bottle. She "got a chill in it" and died.
This fits with her Death Certificate which lists her death as being from Septicemia which she had had for six days. She was last seen by her doctor, Dr C C Muir, on the 4th of March..2,3 She was buried on 6 March 1905 at Alberton Cemetery, 214 Yarram-Port Albert Rd., Alberton, Victoria. Poor Sarah died unmarried and without children.4

Citations

  1. [S192] Vic BDM search , Reg Vic No: 6190 in 1878.
  2. [S255] Death Search Australia, Her Victorian Death Registration No: 3901 in 1905.
  3. [S194] Death Certificate - Victoria, From her Death Certificate registered in the District of Yarrum Yarrum, Victoria. Reg Vic No: 3901 in 1905.
  4. [S194] Death Certificate - Victoria, From her Death Certificate registered in the District of Yarrum Yarrum, Victoria. Reg Vic No:.

Ethel Vardy

F, b. 7 April 1880, d. 1946
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934

Ethel Vardy
     Ethel was born on 7 April 1880 at Yarram Yarram, Buln Buln, Victoria.1 As of 1906,her married name was Kay.2 As of 1939,her married name was Munro.
Ethel Vardy died in 1946 at 81 Darling Road, East Malvern, Melbourne. The cause of her Death was chronic nephritis and cerebral haemorrhage. Strangely this was certified by Mr J.W. Marwick, the City Coroner, who ordered burial of the body without Inquest.
She died without children.2 She was buried on 18 March 1946 at Springvale Cemetery, Melbourne.3

Citations

  1. [S192] Vic BDM search , Reg Vic No: 12706 in 1880.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p.5.
  3. [S196] Australian Certificate. Her Victorian Death Certificate, Reg No: 2938/1946.

Alfred Thomas Vardy Jnr

M, b. 28 July 1882, d. 1963
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934

Alfred Thomas Vardy Jnr - circa 1920
     His was commonly known as Alf. Alfred was born on 28 July 1882 at Yarram, Victoria. Alfred Thomas Vardy (Junior)

He was a tall thin wiry type of man and was the most successful of the sons.

He married Marcella Babington in 1911 and had a family of 6 boys and 2 girls. Roy (deceased); Robert; John; Jean (deceased) Keith (mac) Alan; Alice (Mrs Winter) David.

He worked hard in the early years with his wife and a farm hand, they milked 50 cows by hand: he also rented land and dealt in cattle. It wasn't long before he was able to purchase more land. When I was a boy of 12 he had four properties; 3 for dairying and one for grazing, he also rented property.

His success was mainly due to his ability to deal successfully buying and selling cattle. He was considered the best judge of cattle in the Yarram district.

He purchased an (overland) motor car in 1921. We lived in Maffra at that time and Uncle Alf visited us and took our family to visit the Glenmaggie Weir which was then under the beginnings of its construction. The roads were so bad where he lived at Stacey's Bridge that the car could only be used in the summer months. He passed away in 1963 aged 81 years and right up until the end he kept his interest buying and selling cattle.

On his death he was able to leave each of his five surviving sons a farm.
He predeceased his wife Marcella by 18 years. She passed away in 1981..1



Alfred Thomas Vardy Jnr married Marcella Mildred Babington in 1911 at Victoria. Gippsland and Northern Co-operative Co. Ltd. sold 5 "Fat Calves" for Alf at the local sales. They attained an average price of Pound 4/11- although the highest price paid was Pound 7/1-. This was reported in The Argus where Alf was listed as living at Stacey's Bridge.
Alfred Thomas Vardy Jnr died in 1963 at Yarram, Victoria.

Family

Marcella Mildred Babington b. 1892, d. 1981
Children

Citations

  1. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p.10.

Arthur Ernest Vardy

M, b. 10 September 1884, d. 22 September 1977
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934
     Arthur was born on 10 September 1884 at Yarram, Victoria.1 Artgur Ernest Vardy
was born at Yarram on September 10th 1884. Seventh child of Alfred & Susan Vardy.
A mid wife attended the birth in a slab and bark shack on Church Road, a mile from the town.
There were no made roads, just bush tracks. The country around his home was covered in scrub, the natural habitat for the Paddy Melon Wallaby. As a boy he and his brothers trapped these wallabies with snares for their skins The snares were made from a pole pushed into the ground (called a springer pole) with a light rope which bent the pole similar to a bow. It was fixed by a small piece of wood to a cross piece driven into the ground. When the wallaby sprang the snare the rope loop was jerked upward and lassoed the animal by the neck or the leg. He also helped the family milk a few cows on their free selection. At six years of age he attended school at North Devon.
The education system in those days was very basic - pupils were taught the 3 R's with no frills attached. It as a primary school with the standards of our primary schools today, going to the sixth grade.
Arthur left school when 12 years of age having passed through the 6 grades; and went to work for Albert Coxsedge on a farm at Won Wron for 2/6 (25c) a week. He was forced to sleep in a leaky shed in a bed made of saplings through chaff bags (no sheets) using horse rugs and sacks for blankets. Arthur felt it hard to leave the family home; although they were poor they were a close knit family with strong ties which remained to the end of their days. This was the period of the great land boom depression of the 1890's when his father was away working in Western Australia.
In 1897 when Arthur was thirteen his father returned from the West and took up dairying on a property on Stoney Creek a few miles west of the family home. He and his brother Walter went with their father. The great fire of 1898 destroyed their stock and everything they had - it was a heart breaking time.
When the family moved to Bulong near Woodside, Arthur accompanied them. The farm was too poor to supoort the family so Arthur took up shooting and hunting to help their income and became an expert shot. (In latter years when I accompanied him with parties of good sportsmen, to shoot quail, my father would shoot as many as all the rest of the party put together. It was said he got nine quail with every ten shots.) Durirg the winter he and his elder brother Alf used to camp on Snake Island shooting and snaring Wallabies and kangaroos for their skins.
Around this time Arthur took up bike riding and soon became a good sprint rider. It was also around this time he first met my mother Mabel Bessie Amery whose parents had arrived from England with their parents in the early [18] fifties. My mothers parents were named Bruce. Although both familis travelled on the same sailing ship from England they never really go to know each other till after their arrival in Melbourne.
Mother was the second youngest of a family of 9 childnen - boys and 6 girls. Her father was a plasterer by trade. Dring the early part of the century before
World War 1, the Amery's had a contract to do plastering for a builder who built most of the better type homes and other buildings in Gippsland of that priod. Arthur travelled to Dalby on the Darling Downs in Queensland, where land as being made available for closer settlement. He travelled with a small party from the
Yarram district. The party got a job cutting bricklow scrub for so much a day and keep and were housed in tents. Snakes were plentiful and when they would return in the evening from their long hot day cutting scrub they often found snakes in their tents sometimes lying on the bunks.
Also in the party was an amateur photographer who spent all his spare time and money on his hobby.When I was young father had very good photos of the men at work and all dressed up in their suits in the bush of a Sunday. Later he travelled to New Zealand but could not find work so returned to Yarram.
The family were now living on a dairy farm on the Jack River and Arthur took on a job with his older brother Alf cutting scrub. While on that job the axe was deflected by an over hanging branch and cut deeply ito his righ foot. Owing to the lack of proper medical care the wound became infected which almost cost him his life. He often used to mention the agonising trip to Sale Base Hospital over the rough road or track in a horse and buggy.
Prior to the accident he became engaged to Mabel Amery and purchased a motor bike, one of the first in the Yarram District. Mabel my mother, who lost her mother when only 6 years of age and her father had taken to drink was not very happy and broke off the engagement.
Some time later while in Melbourne she attended a concert and sat next to a young man frcmm Yarram. In the course of the conversation Mother asked him if he knew Arthur Vardy. Then he told her of the accident, Mabel then wrote to Arthur.
They were married on 10th May 1910 at Glenferrie. Her father gave her a wedding reception which was well attended by friends and relatives.
Arthur took his bride to the farm in the valley at Boodyarn near Won Wron that his father had recently purchased. It was part of the Bodman estate. When purchased the only building was a bark hut. Two weatherboard rooms and a bark kitchen were built, all other buildings were of bark and round timber. The land was in its natural virgin state. When my poor mother reached this farm in the wilderness she cried; she felt so alone and isolated. Her neighbours, the people that lived further up the valley were good to her. She did not have much time to shed tears. Within five years of her marriage she had 4 babies. The eldest Glenda born in Yarram private hospital on 24th Feb 1911 and I, Walter the following year 1912 on 24th January. Bernard was next in March 1913 and Jack(now deceased) was born in Sept. 1914. The youngest of the family Mavis was born at Maffra private Hospital on 15th June 1924.
With the help of his brothers and a hired man, they worked long hours clearing the land. The soil was very rich; maize as grown to 17ft high and all other crops did equally well.
For the first 4 years of their marriage while the land was being cleared they worked just for their keep and out-of-pocket expenses 1914 which was a sever drought year, father was given the farm on a share basis for 3 years. During the winter of 1917 father in partnership with his cousin Roy Hull (Lydia, his eldest sister's son) rented 200 acres from Harry Bodman on Greigs Creek, Trenton Valley. It was rich fertile grass land. Although super phosphate was not used then, rye grass.
and white clover grew in profusion. A new 5 roomed house had just been built and the most modern dairy and pig sties. The dairy mas equipped with a 225 gallons per hour Bartram separator and skim milk pump, to pump the milk to the pig sties. Also a 6 unit bucket milking machine plant (One of the first inthe district) driven by a 3 1/2 horse-power engine. The floors of the dair and pig sties were made of laid bricks with cement grotted in. Concrete was seldom used as cement was
expensive and imported from England in wooden barrels. The first year 80 cows were milked by 3 men and all the calves reared. It was a boom time of high prices because of the first world war. The milking machines were only used to take the flush from the cows and discarded by mid January, The following year the herd was increased to 100 cows, a very large herd in those days.
Father did well, and when the lease expired in July 1920 he was able to purchase a 100 acre farm at Mewburn Park, Maffra. This farm is still owned by my deceased brother Jack's family. My elder sister Glenda started school in 1917 during the 1st World War amd I can remember the children riding by on their ponies singing: "Rule Brittania"or"Australia will be there". The pioneering families were 98% British stock and very patriotic in those days.
I started school from Trenton Valley at the beginning of 1918. I rode on a pony behind Glenda a distance of about 3 miles to the school. One day when we had almost reached school a car came along behind us and blew its horn. The pony took fright and bolted throwing us both off. Cars were then so unusual that most horses took fright at such contraptions.
Father paid £52.10 an acre for the Meburn Park property on the Macalister River about a mile from Maffra. The land was very broken and covered with scrub and logs and trees and rabbits, Levee banks had been constructed along parts of the river and some drainage works of swamps had been done. Glenmaggie Weir had then not been constructed. The river flooded from August to October every year with melting of the snow. The big floods went over the banks. During the period from 1920 to 1924 while we remained there, we were not able to milk more than 30 cows by hand. The milk in 20 gal cans was put on the cart and taken to a stand on the road where it was picked up night and morning by horse drawn waggons. Father got into financial difficulties and was offered a farm by his brother Alf, on the Albert River 12 miles west of Yarram at Stacey's Bridge. By this time I was twelve years of age; Glenda 13; Bernie 11; and Jack just 10 and Mavis a baby of 3 mths of age. The farm was 160 acres, some river flats but mostly steep hill country. Here with the help of a hired man we milked 55 cows by hand and separated the milk with a steam turbine driven separator. We all had to work hard, even mother helped with the milking. Our life on that farm when not at school was milking and feeding cows on maize, We hand cut with a sickle, trapping and poisoning rabbits and cutting bracken fern with hooks. It was a hard life working every day from daylight to dark when not at school. We longed to return to Maffra and the farm at Mewburn Park that had been leased to a Mr Potter from Bairnsdale for £2.5/- an acre.
After 3 years father fell out with his brother Alf and we moved back again to Trenton Valley to a neighbouring farm of the one father had rented ten years before in 1917. This time we were share-farming for a third share 33 1/3 in the dollar for Mrs W.E. Bodman. The farm was an exceptionally good one and irrigated from Greigs Creek by flood gates. Father installed milking machines and we milked 75 cows the first year and fattened pigs with the skim milk.
By this time Jack was attending school. He rode a pony four miles to Won Wron. As the members of the family left school they stayed on the farm which was the normal practice in those days.
While at Stacey's Bridge during 1925 Father purchased his first car. It was a second hand 1922 model T-Ford. During the late nineteen twenties dairy farming became quite profitable and father was able to buy a new sedan car. By this time we had increased the herd size to 130 cows, we also grew Barley & Maize for fattening pigs. During the 9 years father stayed there he prospered and with his family's help was able to over come his financial problems. For in those depression years we, like most other families stayed on the farm and worked long hours for our clothes and keep, just; the bare necessities of life.
In the winter of 1936 he returned to his farm at Mewburn Park, accompanied by my mother, Jack and Mavis who was then 12 years of age. Mother did not have long to enjoy a more leisurely life. 2 years later in 1938 she became ill with cancer and died the following year 1939 aged 54 years. Glenda, who had stayed with Bernie and me to house keep returned home at the first news of mother's illness. Mother, like most of her family was a deeply religious woman and her faith seemed to give her courage and fortitude to the very end. Father was very upset at Mothers death but time heals all wounds.
It was just after mothers death that my brother Bernie and I purchased 2 blocks of unimproved irritation land at Riverslea. It had been a cropping and grazing property but with the coming of irrigation the owner Mr Alan Riggall had decided to cut it up into 120 acre blocks for closer settlement. We purchased the homestead block and the one next to it with a new double bail milking shed. The price was £18.5/- per acre ($36.50) My younger brother Jack gradually took over the farm at Mewburn Park and in 1947 father remarried to Miss Hazel Mann who was some 20 years younger. He retired from the farm to live with his bride, at her sister Muriel and her husband Robin King's
home in Powerscourt St. Maffra.
Robin King and his wife had just built one of the first holiday houses an Raymond Island. In those days the Island was serviced by a row boat and if a vehicle had to be taken across, there was and old wooden punt that was ferried across by a chain operated by hand. About this time father purchased a 23 ft motor launch which gave him much pleasure for the many more years he was to live. About 1940 just after mothers death he joined the Maffra Bowling Club and enjoyed many hours of bowling on the Maffra Greens. He also became a member of the Maffra Masonic Lodge. In the later years of his life he spent a great deal of his time on Raymond Island, and enjoyed nothing more than to fish from his motor launch. He was as he had been at all sports, an exceptionally keen fisherman and could handle two lines while most others could scarcely manage one.
He enjoyed many long hours of fishing right up to 12 months before his death. He passed away at Maffra District Hospital on September 22nd 1977 aged 93 years. He was buried in the Maffra cemetery with my mother and was survived by 2 sons and 2 daughters, Walter, Bernard, Glenda (Mrs Carr) and Mavis (Mrs Mills) and nineteen grand children. His second wife Hazel lived for another 4 years and four months and passed away January 1982.
[Walter E. Vardy]2


He married Mabel Bessie Amery in May 1910 at Melbourne, Victoria. Arthur Ernest Vardy was a farmer.
He married Hazel Mann in 1947.
Arthur died on 22 September 1977 at Maffra, Victoria, at age 93 years and 12 days.3

Family 1

Mabel Bessie Amery b. Nov 1884, d. 24 Aug 1939
Children

Family 2

Hazel Mann b. c 1904, d. 11 Jan 1982

Citations

  1. [S192] Vic BDM search , Reg Vic No: 28878 in 1884.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p17-20.
  3. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p.12.

Walter Henry Vardy

M, b. 27 January 1887, d. 1904
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934
     Walter was born on 27 January 1887 at Yarram, Victoria.1
Walter died in 1904 at Yarram, Victoria, Died at 17 years from a bee sting. at age at an unknown age .

Citations

  1. [S192] Vic BDM search , Reg Vic No: 7860 in 1887.