Joseph Gamble

M, b. 7 July 1836, d. 26 April 1896
FatherJames Gamble b. Mar 1805, d. 16 Oct 1867
MotherAgnes Nancy Dunlop b. 1811, d. 25 Feb 1874
ChartsCraw (Crow), James - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Gamble, John - Descendants Chart (Indented)
Gamble, Joseph - Descendant Chart (Box)
Last Edited29 Mar 2019
     Joseph was born on 7 July 1836 at Carnbeg, Parish Killagan, Antrim, IrelandG.
ENTRY FROM FAMILY BIBLE:
Joseph Gamble
Born in Town Land of Carabeg
Parish of Killagan
County Antrim Ireland
(July 22nd 1836)

Jessie Crow
Born in Montrose Scotland
(September 18th 1840)

3 Years & 10 Months; Difference in age
Joseph Gamble
Miller Street
Brunswick.

Leask's report his Birth date as 22-7-1836 and his arrival in Melbourne as February 1939.
Entry in "Victoria and its Metropolis: Past and Present" p638
Gamble, Joseph, East Brunswick, arrived in Victoria when about three years old in 1839. He followed various occupations, such as farming, quarrying and contracting, until, in 1879, he started the Excelsior Steam Crushing and Pavement Works, at King street, East Brunswick, employing at the time twenty hands, and doing 240 yards of metal weekly. There are now twenty-six men engaged, and the weekly output of metal is 400 yards. In 1885 Mr. Gamble launched the Junction Patent Pressed Brick Works at South Preston, under the management of his son, Mr J.A. Gamble, employing four hands at the commencement, and turning out 10,000 bricks a week, while the output now is about 200,000 weekly, and sixty hands are employed. All the bricks are patent steam-pressed,and are used all over the colony, and by the Government to a large extent.
Joseph arrived on 19 April 1839 on the John Barry.
Joseph applied for 30 Acres of land in Yangardook a parish in the County of Bourke near Kororoit today. Regretably on Tuesday, July 7th 1863 it was Gazetted that his application was rejected because his "Description of site too indefinite". This was also the reason for a large number of applicants. Is this early example of bureaucracy gone wild - Hahha.1
He married Jessie Crow on 24 November 1863 at Gisborne, VictoriaG.2 Joseph Gamble was variously a carter, specialising in road materials and construction and brickmaker on 7 September 1869 at Prahran Borough Council. The Argus Supplement of 7 September 1869, page 2, reported on the proceedings of the Prahran Borough Council reporting:"The Public Works Committee recommended for approval tender of Enoch Chambers [Engine Builders]for 1,000 yards two-inch metal ; transfer of contracts Nos. 275 and 282 from Alex. Hay to
Joseph Gamble; that tenders be invited for works in Malvern-road and Union-street, and in Treloar-street to amount of appropriation for same. The several recommendations were agreed to, and the report adopted."
The Argus on 1st October 1868, page 7, further reports: Upon the recommendation of the Public Works Committee, tenders were accepted as follows:-Joseph Gamble, for supplying sand for the year at 4s per load.

On 18 February 1873 Joseph became an initial subscriber to the "Homeward Bound Quartz Mining Company No Liability" which was floated under the provisions of the Mining Companies Act 1871. The place of intended operations was at Sultan Reef, Blackwood and the Head Office was at 68-70 Queen street, Melbourne. The company had 24,000 shares of 5/- each. Joseph purchased 160 shares.3 He was the official Informant on the Death Certificate of William John Gamble.4 Joseph Gamble witnessed the probate of the estate of William John Gamble on 30 August 1876 at The Supreme Court in, The Colony of Victoria, Melbourne, VictoriaG; "Probate of the last Will and Testament of William John Gamble late of Brunswick near the City of Melbourne, Carter deceased, was and is hereby granted to Joseph Gamble of Brunswick aforesaid Builder and Joseph Bostock of North Fitzroy near Melbourne aforesaid Contractor the Executors named in and appointed by the Will. The said Joseph Gamble and Joseph Bostock having been first duly sworn that the said deceased died on the Twenty Seventh day of July One thousand Eight hundred and Seventy Six and that they would well and truly collect and administer according to law and to the best of their knowledge and ability the property lands and hereditaments goods chattels and credits of the said deceased which should come to their hands possessions or knowledge or to the hands or possession of anyother person or persons for them and that they would exhibit and deposit in the Office of the Master in Equity of the said Court a true and perfect inventory of all and singular the property lands and hereditraments goods chattels and credits of the said deceased within Three Calendar Months next ensuring the order granting Probate and a true and just account of the administration of the Estate which they have undertaken as to their receipts and disbursments and as to what portion is retained by them and what portion remains uncollected within Fifteen Calendar months next ensuing the said ordergranting Probate and that the property of the said deceased did not exceed in value the sum of Five Hundred Pounds."
Joseph was awarded a Victoria Government contract on 22 August 1880 to provide "Asphalting and paving to Government printing office, Melbourne" It was contract number 961 valued at £167-12-6. This was extended in October "Additional works under contract 80-81/961: Asphalting and paving Government Printing Office" for the value of £8-5-0.5,6
On 19 Sep 1885, The Fitzroy City Press reported that the Fitzroy City Council had just passed a Finance Committee motion to make payment to J. Gamble for "maintenance metal, 70 pounds", "completion payment 135 pound" and " pro payment No2, maintenance metal, 200 pounds".
As we will see later, James was ultimately wiped out and made bankrupt due to a massive fire in his tar storage pits in 1892. However it was not his first fire in his businesses. His first was reported in The Herald Newspaper on 6 January 1886. I presume from the report that he was able to recover and continue on from this setback.
FIRE AT EAST BRUNSWICK
A fire broke out yesterday at East Brunswick, on the premises of Gamble's Brick and Tar Paving Works, Glenlyon Road. The flames were first observed in the blacksmith's shops, and rapidly spread to the engine house, which was completely destroyed, and also the
stables and a quantity of horse feed. All hands were knocked off, and utilized to subdue the flames, which they succeeded in doing without the necessity of sending for the Fire Brigade. Some consternation was created amongst the spectators; and the men assisting to put the fire out at an explosion which took place caused by two kegs of powder going off. It
is not known whether the premises were insured or not.7

The following article is from The Argus newspaper on 15 July 1892, page
FIRE AT PRESTON. DAMAGE ESTIMATED AT OVER £3,000.
A disastrous fire broke out yesterday morning shortly after 2 o'clock at the works of Messrs. J Gamble and Son, brick and tile makers, Plenty road, Preston, and owing to disadvantageous circumstances it had gained such headway before the firemen were able to extinguish it that the works were almost completely destroyed, and damage amounting to upwards of £3,000 was done. The works were of wood and iron and one story in height, and were the property of the firm. At about 2 o'clock while one of the employees was working at the slush-pit the gas from the slush ignited by some means, probably through the agency of the lamp he was carrying, and in an instant the whole pit was ablaze There were about a dozen men on the night shift at the works, but all they could do with the primitive appliances at hands towards arresting the progress of the flames was of no avail, and the attendance of the fire brigade was therefore awaited with anxiety. The man on duty in the tower at the fire station, a mile away, gave the call at nine minutes past 2, and as speedily as possible the district superintendent Mr. Lindsay, was on the scene with two horse carts, two hand reels, and 20 men from Preston, Collingwood, and Northcote. By this time the flames had spread from the slush-pit to the buildings, and had enveloped the machinery, and though everybody worked with a will, the conflagration was not subdued until almost all the machinery was irretrievably ruined. During the progress of the fire some apprehension was felt lest a small quantity of blasting powder which was known to be on the premises should explode and endanger the lives of the firemen and others. Fortunately, though the fear was partially realised and the powder did explode, it worked no personal injury but confined itself to shattering some machinery. Messrs. J. Gamble and son are heavy losers by the fire, because, while £3,000 will be insufficient to replace the machinery and buildings, and while they have the further consequential loss of the interruption to their business, they are totally uninsured.
.8
Description of goods reported stolen by Joseph Gamble to the Victorian Police

The following article is from The Argus newspaper on 11 April 1893, page
AN INSOLVENT BRICKMAKER.
UNSUCCESSFUL SPECULATIVE BUILDING
An examination sitting was held in the Insolvency Court yesterday in the estate of Joseph Gamble of South Preston, brickmaker.
Mr W H Lewis appearing for the trustee
The estate was sequestrated on the 27th of last month, when the insolvent set down his liabilities in his schedule at £21,119 18s. 4d. and his assets at £22,235 2s 6d., leaving an estimated surplus of £1,115 4s. 2d. He was yesterday examined with reference to some of his principal business transactions, and he said:- I carried on business at South Preston for seven or eight years prior to sequestration as a brick manufacturer. Before then I was a quarry man for about 20 years. At sequestration I owed £21,000, which had run up for the last 30 years. During that time I was always in debt and had an overdraft. All my debts due to unsecured creditors amounting to about £3.000 were incurred in the brick business.
When I started it I did so on borrowed money. I had plenty of assets but no clear cash. At sequestration I had £21 300 worth of real estate, according to my reckoning.
The brickworks at Preston stood on 11½ acres of land, which was mortgaged to the North Melbourne Building Society, from whom I borrowed £6,500 at various times during the last 20 years the Colonial Bank held as security for their debt, land and houses I had at Brunswick and North Fitzroy.
I began dealing with that bank seven or eight years ago. The land at Brunswick and North Fitzroy consisted of about 12 acres. I built houses on some of the land, mostly during the last four years. Fifteen of the houses were in Brunswick and 11 in North Fitzroy, and they were mortgaged to the bank.
None of the Brunswick houses were sold. Six of them were erected 10 years ago, and nine within the last five years. I erected the houses as a speculation.
The bank let me have plenty of money as I had plenty of security.
The 11 houses in Fitzroy were erected within the last four years, and the bank let me have the money. My agreement with the bank was that they were to advance me money at various times on my securities. The last amount they advanced made the total £8,000, all which I received.
I spent some of the money in building kilns and buying machinery. I put down my debt to the North Melbourne Building Society at £6,500. It was principally out of the money I received from them that I built the Brickworks, and bought the 11½ acres of land at Preston.
I built five houses on that land. One cost about £500, and the others about £200 each. None of them have been sold. They were built as a speculation.
I had three houses in Hanover and Young streets, Fitzroy. I bought one of them, and built the other two through the building society. Those houses are all unsold. All my houses are unsold.
My speculation was an unfortunate one. I bought brick machines and engines with some of the money I borrowed from the building society. I never made any profit out of the brickworks or the building specs.
There are only eight houses on the land held by the North Melbourne Building Society. They have entered into possession of the rents.
I had a fire at the brickworks about July, 1892, and between £3 000 and £4,000 worth of property was destroyed by it. There was only a small insurance on the office.
The pitch took fire at 2 a.m. while the men were letting it out of the tank, and it set fire to the belting, and the whole place took fire.
Only two men were working at the time. My son had told them to let the pitch run off before it got too cold and stiff. It is generally let off late at night. It was let off too hot, and the fumes from it took fire from the men's lamps and set fire to the pitch and it blazed the ropes and made the fire which caused the destruction.
This was one of the causes of my insolvency
The examination then closed

Pasted from Joseph died on 26 April 1896 at Braybrook, Melbourne, VictoriaG, Hemiplegia, Broncho Pneumonia at age 59. His death notice, along with his funeral notice, was published in The Argus on Monday April 27, 1896. His death notice read:

GAMBLE: On the 26th inst, at his late residence, Ballarat road, Braybrook, Joseph, the beloved husband of Jessie Gamble, late of East Brunswick and Junction Brickworks, South Preston, aged 59 years. "There is sweet rest in Heaven.". His body was interred on 28 April 1896 at Footscray Cemetery, Yarraville, VictoriaG, at the 503-513 Geelong Road. His funeral notice in the Argus read:

GAMBLE: The Friends of the late Mr. JOSEPH GAMBLE, late of East Brunswick and Junction Brickworks, South Preston, are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of internment, the Footscray Cemetery.

The The funeral is appointed to move from his late residence, Ballarat road, Braybrook, tomorrow (Tuesday April 28), at 3 o'clock.

WARNE and SON, Undertaker, Footscray, and Anderson street, Yarraville.

He was buried in Location FO-Pres*D***232.
Gamble Family Grave in Footscray in Dec 2018

His wife Jessie Crow died on 4 April 1922 at 246 Scotchmer Street, North Fitzroy, VictoriaG, at age 81.

Family

Jessie Crow b. 18 Sep 1840, d. 4 Apr 1922
Children

Citations

  1. [S276] Victorian State Government, Victorian Gazette, Gazette 70, Date: Tuesday, July 7th 1863, p1507.
  2. [S245] Rev Laurie Richards, after 36 years absinces, p114.
  3. [S276] Victorian State Government, Victorian Gazette, Gazette 66, Friday September 12th 1873, p1632.
  4. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate.
  5. [S276] Victorian State Government, Victorian Gazette, Gazette 110, Friday September 24th 1880, p2410.
  6. [S276] Victorian State Government, Victorian Gazette, Gazette 121, Friday October 22nd 1880, p2630.
  7. [S256] Newspaper on Trove, The Herald Newspaper, Melbourne. Wed 6th Jan 1886 page 3.
  8. [S243] Chief Commissioner of Police, Victorian Police Gazette, March 22, 1893 p 82.

Jessie Crow

F, b. 18 September 1840, d. 4 April 1922
FatherAlexander Crow II b. c 1797, d. 22 Oct 1880
MotherJane Kidd b. 9 May 1800, d. 4 Jun 1891
ChartsCraw (Crow), James - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Gamble, John - Descendants Chart (Indented)
Last Edited26 Dec 2018
     Jessie was born on 18 September 1840 at Montrose, Forfarshire, Angus, ScotlandG. She immigrated with her parents Alexander Crow II and Jane Kidd on 15 July 1857 at Port Phillip District; Alexander CROW at age 60 and his wife Jane CROW age 58 left Liverpool aboard the Lady Milton on 12th April 1857. With them were four children - Jane age 20, Jessie age 17, Anne age 18 and John age 14. True to his independent ways he arrived in Melbourne "Un-engaged" to any employer and released to his "own account."1,2 She was a witness at James Mc George and Isabella Crow's wedding on 12 April 1861 at Green Valley Farm, Tweddle Road, Cabbage Tree, VictoriaG.
She married Joseph Gamble on 24 November 1863 at Gisborne, VictoriaG.3 As of 24 November 1863,her married name was Gamble.3
Jessie died on 4 April 1922 at 246 Scotchmer Street at North Fitzroy, VictoriaG, at age 81. She was buried on 5 April 1922. It was a private internment.

Family

Joseph Gamble b. 7 Jul 1836, d. 26 Apr 1896
Children

Citations

  1. [S99] Text , Source: Series VPRS 14 Register of Assisted Immigrants from the United Kingdom held at PRO Victoria: Microfilm copy: VPRS 3502 Book: 11 Pages: 415, 419, 423 & Book: 11A Pages: 70 & 72.
  2. [S212] Family Tree research from Ancestry.com.
  3. [S245] Rev Laurie Richards, after 36 years absinces, p114.

Jane Kidd

F, b. 9 May 1800, d. 4 June 1891
FatherCharles Kidd d. b 1851
MotherAnn Anderson
ChartsCraw (Crow), James - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Last Edited29 Dec 2018
     Jane Kidd was also known as Jean Kid. Jane was born on 9 May 1800 at Montrose, Forfarshire, Angus, ScotlandG.
EXTRACT OF LETTER FROM LAURIE RICHARDS,

Jane Kidd was widowed (?) then went to Australia with her 8 children, 3 of whom moved to Dunedin after they married.

She settled in Gisborne, Vic... though perhaps they started in Ballarat first for they were goldmining before turning to farming. I have two stories about her. One that she lost her wedding ring and so her sons made a new one from nuggets, shaping it on the point of an anvil. I think my mother may have the ring though, unfortunately, it has been alloyed and made into a signet ring.

The other is that, as an old lady, she killed a snake with the poker when it appeared from under the furniture. She died the next day.
She married Alexander Crow II on 11 June 1826 at Montrose, Forfarshire, Angus, ScotlandG. Her married name was Crow. Jane Kidd and Alexander Crow II arrived on 15 July 1857 to Port Phillip District; Alexander CROW at age 60 and his wife Jane CROW age 58 left Liverpool aboard the Lady Milton on 12th April 1857. With them were four children - Jane age 20, Jessie age 17, Anne age 18 and John age 14. True to his independent ways he arrived in Melbourne "Un-engaged" to any employer and released to his "own account."1,2 Jane Kidd and Alexander Crow II lived on 12 April 1861 at Green Valley Farm, Tweddle Road, Cabbage Tree, VictoriaG. Jane arrived circa 1868.
Jane died on 4 June 1891 at Gisborne, VictoriaG, at age 91. Her body was interred on 6 June 1891 at Gisborne, VictoriaG, at the local cemetery.
Headstone of Jane Crow (nee Kidd)

Photograph by Andrew Clark

Family

Alexander Crow II b. c 1797, d. 22 Oct 1880
Children

Citations

  1. [S99] Text , Source: Series VPRS 14 Register of Assisted Immigrants from the United Kingdom held at PRO Victoria: Microfilm copy: VPRS 3502 Book: 11 Pages: 415, 419, 423 & Book: 11A Pages: 70 & 72.
  2. [S212] Family Tree research from Ancestry.com.

Francis Gairn Cairns Snr.

M, b. 16 November 1822, d. 9 June 1887
FatherJohn Cairns
MotherKatharine Mc Konach
ChartsCairns, John - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Last Edited6 Oct 2018
     Francis was born in 1822 at Aberdeenshire, ScotlandG. He was christened on 16 November 1822 at Birse, Aberdeenshire, ScotlandG; To quote from his Baptism entry; "John Cairns in Bridgend & his wife Kath McKonach had a child baptised named Francis Garden. James Finlay, Wester Clune and Charles Mitchell, Ennochy, witnesses".1 Francis Gairn Cairns Snr. was also known as Francis' second name is variously recorded throughout his life as "Gairn" or "Gavin" however is quite clearly "Garden" on his Baptism entry in the Old Parochial Register. It maybe that the scribe got it wrong and his parents could not read the entry to confirm their chosen name. For the sake of this research I have chosen to use the earliest recorded name, hopefully the closest to what his parents chose to name him. He was employed by as a Station Master.
He married Elizabeth Johnston on 7 September 1860 at Dunedin, Otago, New ZealandG.
Francis Gairn Cairns Snr. died on 9 June 1887 at 209 Moray Street, South Melbourne, VictoriaG, at age 64. Of a ruptured blood vessel (supposed.) The Death Certificate for Francis Gairn states that he was a Collector. At the time of his death, Francis had spent about thirty years in New Zealand before being in Victoria for about two years. His body was interred on 11 June 1887 at Melbourne General Cemetery, MelbourneG. Presb. O 1097.

Family

Elizabeth Johnston b. 9 Feb 1838, d. 3 Apr 1880
Children

Citations

  1. [S193] OLd Parochial Register of Birse, Aberdeenshire, Scotland., Baptism Francis Garden Cairns, 16 Nov 1822, unknown repository.

Elizabeth Johnston

F, b. 9 February 1838, d. 3 April 1880
FatherHugh Johnston b. 1800, d. 10 Nov 1871
MotherGrace Ross Meikle b. 20 Aug 1801, d. 9 May 1879
ChartsCairns, John - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Last Edited30 Apr 2000
     ELIZABETH JOHNSTON:

Cemetery Transcript from Northern Cemetery; Dunedin NZ

CAIRNS; Elizabeth: Died 3 April 1880, aged 40 years, of Peritonitis. Occupation: Nil. Resident of Brook Street. Born Linlithgowshire. 21 years in NZ. Last came from Scotland. Buried 6 April 1880. Informant F.G. Cairns.


IMMIGRATION:

Was said to have arrived "WITH HER PARENTS AND YOUNGER SISTERS" in 1858 aboard the ship "Three Bells", arriving in Dunedin on 13th July 1858.


MARRIAGE:

Extract from: "Intention to Marry" Register 1860:
30th August:
NAMES: Francis Cairns Elizabeth Johnston
CONDITION: Batchelor Spinster
CALLING OR
PROFESSION: Assistant Jetty Keeper -----
AGE: 30 23
DWELLING PLACE: Dunedin Dunedin
LNGTH RESIDENCE: 6 months 6 months
PLACE WHERE MARRIAGE TO BE SOLOMNISED: In the house of Duncan McFarlane, Pelichet Bay Dunedin.
NAME OF OFFICIATING MINISTER: The Revd. Donald M. Stuart.

N.B.: Duncan Mc Farlane, above, is Elizabeth's brother-in-law, being the husband of her sister Grace Johnston. Her was commonly known as Betty. She was christened on 9 February 1838. Elizabeth was born on 9 February 1838 at Northgate, Livingston, West Lothian, ScotlandG. Elizabeth arrived on 13 July 1858.
She married Francis Gairn Cairns Snr. on 7 September 1860 at Dunedin, Otago, New ZealandG.
Elizabeth died on 3 April 1880 at Dunedin, Otago, New ZealandG, at age 42. Her body was interred on 6 April 1880 at Dunedin, Otago, New ZealandG, at the Northern Cemetery.

Family

Francis Gairn Cairns Snr. b. 16 Nov 1822, d. 9 Jun 1887
Children

James Hull

M, b. circa 1828, d. 28 May 1911
FatherThomas Hull
Last Edited18 Feb 2019
     James Hull was born circa 1828 at Wootton, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, 51.8754381,-1.3716518G.
He married Isabella Hollis circa 1849 at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, EnglandG. James Hull emigrated from London, EnglandG, aboard the ship "Bombay", bound for Port Phillip Bay. He arrived in December 1852 to Port Phillip Bay; with his wife Isabella. James was a Farmer.
James Hull died on 28 May 1911 at "Musgrove", Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. The Gippsland Times reported on Monday 5 June 1911: Deaths. HULL.-On the 28th May, 1911, at his son's residence, Mr Thomas Hull, "Musgrove," Welshpool, Gippsland, James Hull, sen., after a painful illness, aged 84 years. A colonist of over 60 years. He was buried on 31 May 1911 at Coburg Cemetery, Melbourne, VictoriaG.

Family

Isabella Hollis b. c 1831, d. 23 Nov 1904
Children

Isabella Hollis

F, b. circa 1831, d. 23 November 1904
FatherJames Hollis
MotherMary Egglestone
Last Edited18 Feb 2019
     Isabella Hollis was born circa 1831 at Oxfordshire, EnglandG.
She married James Hull circa 1849 at Woodstock, Oxfordshire, EnglandG. As of circa 1849,her married name was Hull. Isabella Hollis arrived circa 1852 to Port Phillip District.1
Isabella Hollis died on 23 November 1904 at Cramer Street, Preston, Melbourne, VictoriaG. She died from Heart Disease and Dropsy.

Family

James Hull b. c 1828, d. 28 May 1911
Children

Citations

  1. [S196] Australian Certificate. Calculated from her Victorian Death Certificate.

William Vardy

M
Last Edited20 Feb 2001
     He married Louise Reid. William was employed. As Alfred Thomas Vardy's father, William, presented him at his baptism on 30 September 1849 at Yetminster, Dorset, EnglandG.1

Family

Louise Reid
Child

Citations

  1. [S334] Unknown volume, Baptismal Record found on FindMyPast.com.au: Alfred Thmas Vardy, unknown repository.

Louise Reid

F
Last Edited20 Feb 2001
     She married William Vardy. Louise, as Alfred Thomas Vardy's mother, presented him at his baptism on 30 September 1849 at Yetminster, Dorset, EnglandG.1

Family

William Vardy
Child

Citations

  1. [S334] Unknown volume, Baptismal Record found on FindMyPast.com.au: Alfred Thmas Vardy, unknown repository.

Alfred Thomas Vardy

M, b. 1848, d. 8 June 1927
Alfred Thomas Vardy
Yarrum
FatherWilliam Vardy
MotherLouise Reid
ChartsVardy, Alfred Thomas Decendants
Last Edited17 Dec 2020
     Alfred was born in 1848 at Yetminster or Sherborne, Dorset, EnglandG. Alfred Thomas Vardy

Founder of the Vardy family in Gippsland deserted ship in Port Phillip Bay around 1866.
He was born in 1848 at Yetminster Dorsetshire, England to poor farm labouring parents and was one of a large family. One day he was sent to mind crows off a crop, but was persuaded by another boy to go down to the sea to see the big ships. When he returned his father was so angry that he gave his blond blue eyed son a sound thrashing. Young Alfred who was only 10 years of age was so incensed by this treatment that he immediately ran away from home and got a job as a cabin boy on a sailing ship. He served on the ships for some years sailing to ports all round the world. Although illiterate he gradually rose to the rank of A.B. (able seaman).

Some time around 1866 Able Seaman Alfred Thomas Vardy was on board the good ship Juliet when she dropped anchor in Port Phillip Bay. Shore leave was granted to all the crew except Vardy and another sailor who were left on board as watch.

This made Alfred very angry: he and his mate decided to desert ship, for in the minds of sailors Victoria was still an Eldorado. Desertion was a serious offence and all who were caught were imprisoned on junks in the Bay and severely dealt with. Before leaving the ship they pulled the bungs out of a number of tar barrels on the deck, in order to delay pursuit, then lowered the Captains dingy and rowed ashore.

They were so scared that on reaching the shore they parted company and never met up again.

Alfred walked all night putting as much distance between him and the ship as possible. He was able to find employment while he laid low for a while. He heard of new finds in the Gippsland region and for him the lure of gold was still strong. So plucking up courage he ventured down to the sea again and booked passage to Port Albert.

On leaving Port Albert he arrived at the small township of Yarram Yarram - a native word for devil devil or man on horse back. His first job was ploughing a small field for Mrs. Juke who had the only hotel in the place. A single mould board plough is hard to operate even by a skilled plowman and Alfred was no ploughman. His furrows were so crooked that Mrs. Juke said to him " I thought you said you could plough". He replied " Aye, Madam I can, but not this sort of ploughing. The only place I can plough is the ocean." He left Yarram Yarram with a bullock wagon bound for the diggings in the upper Thompson. On the way as they travelled through the bush to Roseday the came upon a bullock team yoked to a wagon laden with beer and other supplies for the thirsty diggers.

The team seemed totally unattended but a search found the bullocky and his mates lying on the ground in a drunken stupor. They had helped themselves to the cargo by boring gimlet holes in the beer barrels and sucking the contents out with a straw.

He stayed only a short while on the gold fields where he just managed to exist. He then returned via Maffra and Sale to Yarram. He then engaged in a carrying business using pack horses to carry goods from Yarram to Walhalla. He was fond of telling a story of how one day while working in the bush he was surrounded by a pack of hungry ferocious dingoes and he was forced to take refuge in a tree where he had to remain for many hours before the doges went away.

His marriage certificate state his profession as a carrier, resident of Rosedale, but after his marriage to Susan Clark of Yarram Yarram the local wheel wright's daughter, he gave up the carrying and got a job at a flour mill near the town, owned by Abraham Bland.

He also took up a small selection of 40 acres, a mile and a half west of the town on Church Road, where he built the bush shack for his wife and where all the family of eleven children were born. He would toil all day at the flour mill and then rush out night and morning building and fencing and clearing his small selection

On Xmas eve 1870 Alfred Thomas Vardy took Susan Clark for his wedded wife. Susan had arrived with her parents John Clarke Wheelwright and his wife Jemima (Sherwood) from London, a baby in arms about 1854 and attended the first Yarram private school where the fee was a penny a day.

She was a strong willed capable woman and in those early days was in demand to play accordion at the local dances. Susan was the eldest of a family of 2 girls and one boy. Joe and Molly were born after the family arrived in Australia. Molly later married a Mr. Whitford and reared a large family. As I remember here she was a widow living in Yarram and much smaller in stature than her sister Susan who was a big woman. The brother Joe I cannot recall but there was a Joe Clark who had one of the early successful Jersey Studs at Toora who was a cousin of my fathers.

In the years to come Susan bore eleven children 7 boys and 4 girls. The first born Lydia (Mrs. Tom Hull) William (Will) Alice ( Mrs. Charlie Smith) Ethel (Mrs. Kay). Alfred (Alf), Sarah, who died when a young woman, Arthur (my father) Walter who died in his teens from a bee sting:; Percival (Perc) Leslie (Les) and Frank.

All married and reared families except Ethel (Mrs. Kay). In all there were 34 grand children.

The six surviving sons all became successful dairy farmers. Alf who was the most successful dairy farmers. Alf who was the most successful was considered the best judge of beef cattle in the Yarram district.

Over the years Alfred extended his bush home to accommodate his large family. On his small selection Susan his wife with the help of the family milked a few cows and set the milk in flat dishes and then skimmed the cream off which she made into butter and sold to the Yarram store keeper, WC Growse. The butter quality was good and eagerly sought after by the local residents. While her husband worked about mainly fencing (post & rail), the young sons snared the paddy melon wallabies that were in large numbers in the thick scrub that surrounded their small selection. This type of Wallaby is today extinct in Victoria.

In the boom years of the eighteen eighties Alfred Vardy selected a further 208 acres in the hill country a few miles north of his home. Here with the help of his sons he spent all the time he could afford clearing the land. It was part of the Strezlecki Ranges that was known as the Big Scrub. It was step rock strewn country and the natural habitat of the Lyre birds that my father always referred to as pheasants.

The boom broke in the early nineties when a severe depression set in. Companies and banks collapsed and work was almost unobtainable.

Alfred was forced to sell his selection for a mere song in order to pay his debts but was fortunate in that he was able to get a job caring for draft horses that were being shipped to Albany West Australia to develop the timber industry.

On arrival he was put in charge of the horses. This job he kept for a number of years while the bad times lasted. He was able to occasionally visit his wife and family.

He was medium height, blue eyes and fair skin and of sober habits and by those who knew him well "one of natures gentlemen". The manager of the mill where he worked regularly wrote letters for him to his wife and family.

In the latter part of the eighteen nineties when things improved he returned from the west. This was the time that the dairy industry was expanding rapidly, helped by government subsidies. The cream separator had been developed with refrigeration. This enabled butter to be shipped on the long voyage to England. At first small creameries were set up where farmers took their milk to be separated. The cream was then taken to the main butter factory to be churned into butter mainly for export. The farmers returned with the skim to the farm and fed it to pigs. Alfred joined the rush and started dairying on a small property a few miles west of the family home, on stony Creek, with two of his sons, Arthur (my father) and Walter.

He was given the farm rent free in order that he carried out improvements which included clearing and fencing the land. The great Gippsland fire in 1898 swept down on the little farm destroying most of their cows and young stock. Those that were alive were so badly burned that they had to be destroyed. He built up his herd again and gradually made progress.

After leaving Stoney Creek he rented a farm at Boolong near Woodside, but the soil was poor and the rain fall insufficient. One day in Yarram he met Mr. John Moore of Tooloonook.
Mr. Moore had known Alfred and his family for many years. The family small home selection boundary had adjoined the large Tooloonook estate. Johnny Moore said to him "How are you going Vardy?" Alfred replied 'none too good' Johnny Moore then said " I have a farm that should suit you". When he mentioned Lynch's (the name of the original selector of the farm) and the rent Alfred eagerly accepted the offer.

The farm on the Jack River was very rich alluvial soil. Here on this farm Alfred and his family prospered. Ploughing was done by a single furrow mould board plough pulled by two horses. Grass hay was cut with hand scythe.

The cows were milked by hand. The separator called a steam turbine was driven by a boiler. Alfred and his wife during early 1910 purchased a farm of 160 acres at Boodyarn about 3 miles north of Won Wron on Bodmans Creek. It was a narrow fertile valley surrounded by forest clad hills. My father Arthur brought his bride Mabel, my mother to the farm in May of the same year.

Here with the help of his sons Alfred prospered. During 1012-13 just before the first World War he and wife took a trip home to England. His wife Susan, my grandmother had kept in touch with Alfred's sisters in Dorset over the years. The name Vardy is quite common around Dorset today. In old English the word Vardy means verdict.

Alfred was the proud owner of one of the first cars in the district purchasing a model T Ford in 1919. I can vividly remember that car; his younger son Frank wearing a long white dust coat did most of the driving. The old man himself did learn to drive that car but my grandmother refused to go out with him for he was now over 70 years of age. The old couple celebrated their golden wedding on Xmas eve 1920 at the Won Wron Hall. All the family and descendants attended except our family. We had just moved to Maffra although my mother protested and said "Arthur should go" father would not budge, claiming the weather was too hot to make such a long journey with horse and jinker.

Alfred & Susan retired to Yarram during 1921 but the old man did not live long to enjoy his retirement. During 1925 he was forced to his bed with a growth on the spine. A nurse was engaged to look after him in the home. All the family and grand children used to visit him regularly. We would go to the house and wait in the kitchen for our turn to be admitted to see the old man with his long white beard (for he had never shaved in his life). It was during those visits (I was fourteen years of age and just left school) he would tell me some stories of the years of his early life. Of his adventurous life at sea and how few people would venture out at night in the early days near Yarram because of the Aborigines and their spears.

He passed away during June 1927 aged 79 years and was buried in the Yarram cemetery. His wife lived another 7 years and died in 1934 aged 80 years and joined her husband.

Now 1982 as I complete writing this account of my own pioneering grand parents, fifty five years have passed since the old man died. Descendants from the family are now scattered all over Australia and even overseas.

They were only two of the thousands of pioneers who developed this country and left us a great heritage.
[Walter E. Vardy]1

He was baptized on 30 September 1849 at Yetminster, Dorset, EnglandG.2 Alfred arrived circa 1866.3
He married Susannah Clarke on 24 December 1870 at Yarram Yarrm, VictoriaG.4
They celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversery and made note of this in The Argus of 8 January 1921 -"On the 24th December, 1870, at Yarram, by Rev. Henry Moore, Alfred Thomas, second son of late William Vardy, Dorset, England, England, to Susannah, eldest daughter of late John Clarke of Yarram, Present address:- "Home View", Won Wron South Gippsland."

Alfred and Susannah's Golden Wedding Photo..
The Death Certificate for Alfred Thomas states that he was a retired farmer.
Alfred died on 8 June 1927 at Yarram Yarrm, VictoriaG, at age at an unknown age . Alfred died of "Ostioma of Spine" and "Heart Failure" which he was described as having for 3 years.. His body was interred on 9 June 1927 at Victoria at the Yarram Cemetery. His death notice in the The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p13. reads as: "VARDY.—On the 8th June, at St. Elmo hospital, Yarram, Alfred Thomas Vardy, beloved husband of Susannah, loving father of Lydia, William, Alice, Sarah (deceased), Ethel, Alfred, Arthur, Walter (deceased), Percy, Leslie, and Frank. Aged 79 years. A patient sufferer at rest." His obituary reads as: From the "Personal" column of an unidentified local newspaper:

"After considerable suffering, and bedridden for 17 months, Mr Alfred Thomas Vardy found happy release in death on 8th inst. at Yarrum. He was an interesting personality, in as much as he was a self-made man. His was a life of toil, finishing with well earned retirement, but marredby ill-health. Mr Vardy was a native of Westminster England, born in the year 1848. He went to sea at the age of 10 years, enduring much hardship before the mast. He was 19 when the ship Juliet, on which he was an able seaman, reached Australia. Melbourne possessed attractions for the young sailorman, and he decided to quit the sea and seek his fortune on the land. While looking for a job, the late Mrs Dukes, of Yarram, engaged him as a ploughman. He had never seen a plough, but he reckoned there was no harm in having a try. The furrows were so crooked, and the work so badly done, that Mrs Dukes said to him, "I thought you could Plough." The young sailor replied, "Yes, mum, I can plough the ocean." They parted, and the young man found employment at Rosedale. He was in the employ of a Mr. Watt, who packed goods to the Walhalla goldfields. YoungVardy had charge. This went on for a few years, when he returned to this district, and married Miss Clarke, daughter of the late John Clarke, a blacksmith and wheelwright in early Yarrum. They Lived in Yarrum and Mr Vardy worked for the late Abraham Bland. He selected 30 acres of scub land on Church Road, and while working during the day for others, he at night and in the early morning cleared his own block. This was characteristic of the man. He was very industrious, and for re-creation found even more work. This toffer of the early seventies selected 208 acres in the hills, which he afterwards sold to nr Morgan. His next move was to lease land on the Tooloonook estate, a block known as Lynch's, and this he farmed for 20 years. In 1913 Mr. and Mrs. Vardy took a trip to the OLD Country,after being absent 46 years. He found his old home intact, and had pleaseure in again meeting his sisters and other relations. He returned to Yarrum greatly benefitted in health. He then bought 160 acres from the Bodman estate, Won Wron, and successfully engaged in dairying till retiring about five years ago. Unfortunately ill-health overtook him after he had been in Yarrum about three years. He left a widow and family of six sons and three daughters of a large family of eleven, Sarah having died at 27, and Walter at 17 years of age. He left 27 grand children and four great grand children.

Family

Susannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934
Children

Citations

  1. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p1-4.
  2. [S334] Unknown volume, Baptismal Record found on FindMyPast.com.au: Alfred Thmas Vardy, unknown repository.
  3. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p.1.
  4. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, Willian VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.

Susannah Clarke

F, b. 1853, d. November 1934
Susannah Vardy
Photograph by Andrew Clark
FatherJohn Clarke b. 1820
MotherJemima Sherwood b. 1820, d. 8 Sep 1882
ChartsVardy, Alfred Thomas Decendants
Last Edited17 Dec 2020
     Susannah was born in 1853 at London, Middlesex, EnglandG.1
She married Alfred Thomas Vardy on 24 December 1870 at Yarram Yarrm, VictoriaG.2 As of 24 December 1870,her married name was Vardy.3 Susannah Clarke was employed by Farmers wife.
They celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversery and made note of this in The Argus of 8 January 1921 -"On the 24th December, 1870, at Yarram, by Rev. Henry Moore, Alfred Thomas, second son of late William Vardy, Dorset, England, England, to Susannah, eldest daughter of late John Clarke of Yarram, Present address:- "Home View", Won Wron South Gippsland."

Alfred and Susannah's Golden Wedding Photo..

Susannah died in November 1934 at Yarram, VictoriaG, at age at an unknown age .

Family

Alfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
Children

Citations

  1. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, Calculated from Certificate of Willian VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.
  2. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, Willian VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.
  3. [S201] Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages, Birth Certificate, Victoria, Australia, William VARDY, Vic Birth Reg No: 6392/1874.

John Clarke

M, b. 1820
Last Edited18 Dec 2020
     John Clarke was born in 1820 at Willingale, Essex, EnglandG.1
He married Jemima Sherwood circa 1841 at Bryanston Square, London, EnglandG.2 John Clarke and Jemima Sherwood appeared in the English census of 1851 at Grove Street, Mile End Old Town, Stepney London. He was reported to have the occupation of Wheelwright. No children were listed as living with them at this Census..1 John Clarke and Jemima Sherwood arrived circa 1856 to VictoriaG.2

Family

Jemima Sherwood b. 1820, d. 8 Sep 1882
Children

Citations

  1. [S299] Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census, https://www.findmypast.com.au/transcript
    John Clarke and Jemina Clarke (nee Sherwood).
  2. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate, Death Certificate; Jemima CLARKE (nee Sherwood); Reg Vic No: 10536/1882.

Jemima Sherwood

F, b. 1820, d. 8 September 1882
FatherThomas Sherwood
MotherSarah Pope
Last Edited18 Dec 2020
     Jemima Sherwood was also known as Jemima Shearwood. She was born in 1820 at Hackney, London, Middlesex, EnglandG.1
She married John Clarke circa 1841 at Bryanston Square, London, EnglandG.1 Jemima Sherwood and John Clarke appeared in the English census of 1851 at Grove Street, Mile End Old Town, Stepney London. He was reported to have the occupation of Wheelwright. No children were listed as living with them at this Census..2 Jemima Sherwood and John Clarke arrived circa 1856 to VictoriaG.1
Jemima died on 8 September 1882 at Yarram Yarram at Alberton Shire, Buln Buln, VictoriaG, She died after suffering Bronchitis for one year according to her doctor at age at an unknown age .3,1 She was buried on 10 September 1882 at Yarram Yarram, Buln Buln, VictoriaG.1 Her married name was Clarke.

Family

John Clarke b. 1820
Children

Citations

  1. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate, Death Certificate; Jemima CLARKE (nee Sherwood); Reg Vic No: 10536/1882.
  2. [S299] Ancestry.com, 1851 England Census, https://www.findmypast.com.au/transcript
    John Clarke and Jemina Clarke (nee Sherwood).
  3. [S255] Death Search Australia, Death Registration BDM Vic online. Vic Reg No: 10536/1882.

Thomas Hull

M, d. 9 May 1938
Thomas Hull
3rd Jan 1893
FatherJames Hull b. c 1828, d. 28 May 1911
MotherIsabella Hollis b. c 1831, d. 23 Nov 1904
ChartsVardy, Alfred Thomas Decendants
Last Edited5 Dec 2020
     His was commonly known as Tom. Thomas Hull was born on 15 July 1864 at Preston, Melbourne, VictoriaG.
He married Lydia Vardy on 3 January 1893 at Trinity Church, Yarram, VictoriaG. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1903 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. Thomas had a listed occupation of grazier and she of home duties. He resided at, at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG, on in 1908. 1. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1909 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. Thomas had a listed occupation of grazier and she of home duties. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1914 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. Thomas had a listed occupation of grazier and she of home duties. He resided at Binglukee Nth, at Wycheproof, VictoriaG, on in 1915. Thomas was employed at Yarrum as a Farmer at Yarram, VictoriaG, in June 1918. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1919 and listed as living at Wycheproof, VictoriaG. Thomas had a listed occupation of farmer and she of home duties.
Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1932 and listed as living at Won Wron, Victoria. Thomas had a listed occupation of farmer. Thomas and Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1936 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, VictoriaG. Thomas had a listed occupation of "no occupation" and she of home duties.
Thomas died on 9 May 1938 at Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Melbourne, VictoriaG, from an enlarged Prostate and Cysto-urethro-pyelonephritis, probably as a complication of his "Enlarged Prostate" (cancer?) which he had suffered "for years". at age at an unknown age . His body was interred on 11 May 1938 at The Necropolis, Springvale, Melbourne, VictoriaG. Lydia Vardy [by Alfred E. Vardy]
The eldest of the family married Thomas Hull a farmer at
Welshpool.
There were two children, Roy (deceased) and Elsie.
Lydia took pity on a small boy named George Frost who had an infected foot and was living in a tent with his father, a navvy working on the building of the South Gippsland Railway line around the turn of the century She and her husband later adopted the boy who was nick-named Daido. He enlisted and was killed in the first world war, aged 19 years.
Tom was keen on horse racing and kept a stable and was noted as a bit of a gambler.
He sold out at Welshpool and purchased a wheat growing property at Wycheproof.
He struck a series of bad seasons and got into financial difficulties.
Lydia purchased a large house at Wanda Road, Caulfield and let sections as flats, where she and her husband with Roy remained till their deaths.
In my younger days when I made visits to the city I often stayed with my Aunt Lydia at Wanda Rd.2

Family

Lydia Vardy b. 7 Nov 1871, d. 6 Jan 1954
Children

Citations

  1. From Roy's enrollment records at Caulfield Grammar.
  2. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p5.

Lydia Vardy

F, b. 7 November 1871, d. 6 January 1954

Lydia Vardy - 1893

Lydia Vardy - circa 1920
FatherAlfred Thomas Vardy b. 1848, d. 8 Jun 1927
MotherSusannah Clarke b. 1853, d. Nov 1934
ChartsVardy, Alfred Thomas Decendants
Last Edited17 Dec 2020
     Lydia was born on 7 November 1871 at Yarram Yarram, Buln Buln, VictoriaG.
She married Thomas Hull on 3 January 1893 at Trinity Church, Yarram, VictoriaG. As of 3 January 1893,her married name was Hull. Extract from unpublished family history written by Walter E. Vardy 1982: "Alfred Thomas and Susan Vardy - Founders of the Vardy Family in Gippsland"

The eldest of the family married Thomas Hull a farmer at Welshpool. There were two children, Roy (deceased) and Elsie.

Lydia took pity on a small boy named George Frost who had an infected foot and was living in a tent with his father, a navvy working on the building of the South Gippsland Railway line around the turn of the century.

She and her husband later adopted the boy who was nick-named Daido. He enlisted and was killed in the first world war, aged 19 years. Tom was keen on horse racing and kept a stable and was noted as a bit of a gambler.

He sold out at Welshpool and purchased a wheat growing property at Wycheproof.

He struck a series of bad seasons and got into financial difficulties. Lydia purchased a large house at Wanda Road, Caulfield and let sections as flats, where she and her husband with Roy remained till their deaths.

In my younger days when I made visits to the city I often stayed with my Aunt Lydia at Wanda Rd.1



Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1903 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of grazier. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1909 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of grazier. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1914 and listed as living at Welshpool, Sth Gippsland, VictoriaG. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of grazier. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1919 and listed as living at Wycheproof, VictoriaG. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of farmer.
Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1924 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, VictoriaG. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties. Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1931 and listed as living at Won Wron, Victoria. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties. Lydia and Thomas appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1936 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, VictoriaG. Lydia had a listed occupation of home duties and he of "no occupation". Lydia appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1939 and listed as living at 23 Wanda Road, Caulfield, VictoriaG. And he of home duties.
Lydia died on 6 January 1954 at 23 Wanda Road, at Caulfield, VictoriaG, She died of Carcinoma of both the breast and colon which she had been suffering for 6 to 10 years. at age 82.2 She was buried on 8 January 1954 at Springvale Cemetery, MelbourneG.2 Lydia Vardy [by Alfred E. Vardy]
The eldest of the family married Thomas Hull a farmer at
Welshpool.
There were two children, Roy (deceased) and Elsie.
Lydia took pity on a small boy named George Frost who had an infected foot and was living in a tent with his father, a navvy working on the building of the South Gippsland Railway line around the turn of the century She and her husband later adopted the boy who was nick-named Daido. He enlisted and was killed in the first world war, aged 19 years.
Tom was keen on horse racing and kept a stable and was noted as a bit of a gambler.
He sold out at Welshpool and purchased a wheat growing property at Wycheproof.
He struck a series of bad seasons and got into financial difficulties.
Lydia purchased a large house at Wanda Road, Caulfield and let sections as flats, where she and her husband with Roy remained till their deaths.
In my younger days when I made visits to the city I often stayed with my Aunt Lydia at Wanda Rd.3

Family

Thomas Hull d. 9 May 1938
Children

Citations

  1. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History.
  2. [S189] Victorian Death Certificate, Lydia Hull.
  3. [S30] Walter Edward Vardy, Vardy, Unpublished History, p5.

Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble

M, b. 7 May 1911, d. 15 July 1967
FatherHerbert Joseph Gamble b. 3 Jul 1882, d. 9 Nov 1960
MotherMabel Cairns b. 27 May 1879, d. 8 Jun 1955
ChartsCairns, John - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Craw (Crow), James - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Gamble, John - Descendants Chart (Indented)
Gamble, Joseph - Descendant Chart (Box)
Last Edited18 Jul 2019
     His was commonly known as Russ. Hugh was born on 7 May 1911 at East Brunswick, Melbourne, VictoriaG. Educated at Scotch College.
Fellow of the Pharmaceutical Society.
Squadron Leader R.A.A.F..
General Manager MAY & BAKER (Aust). In a book "A History of May & Baker 1834-1984" A photo of Russell has the caption " ...... with H.R.J. Gamble, a fellow Director, 1956". During this year (1929), as a student at Scotch College, Russ was a member of the schools "Dramatic Club".

Hugh commenced an Apprentiship on 25 November 1929 at 280 Bourke Street in Melbourne. He was Indentured by his father to Mr Herbert Eaton Daylesford Stevens, Pharmacist of 280 Bourke Street, Melbourne, to complete a four year Appenticeship in Pharmacy under the Medical Act 1915; The Pharmacy Regulations 1917 & 1925 and administered by the Pharmacy Board. This was completed in January 1934. Hugh appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1936 and listed as living at 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, Melbourne, VictoriaG. Hugh had a listed occupation of student.
He married Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott on 22 April 1936.
Newspaper Article - The Argus (Melbourne) Thursday 23/4/1936 -
Gamble—Scott
A charming wedding took place at the Scotch College Chapel last night, when Mavis Maplesden Balfour, eldest daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. W. H. Scott, of 82 Cromer Street, Preston, was married to H. J. Russell, elder son of Mr. and Mrs.W. J. Gamble, of 483 Neerim road, Murrumbeena, by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson.
The bride made a most attractive picture in her gown of Limerick lace mountedon stiff silk, which had been worn by her grandmother on her wedding day.
The close-fitting bodice had pretty bell sleeves, and the very full skirt fell into a train at the back. A tulle cap encircled with pearls was worn on her head and a veil of Limerick lace flowed from the nape of her neck.
The bride, who was given away by her father, was attended by her cousin, Mrs.J. H. Begg, her sister, Miss Lorraine Scott,and by two small girls—Betty Gamble and Helen Scott. They were dressed alike in picturesque frocks of parchment coloured taffeta, with pleated fichus edgingthe bodices, and full graceful skirts. Salmon-pink roses were worn on their dresses and the same flowers formed their becoming wreaths. The two little girls carried baskets of roses, and the two older attendants held period posies of roses. The bridegroom's brother, Mr. Herbert Gamble, acted as best man. After the ceremony a reception was held at 9 Highbury grove, Kew.
Newspaper Article - Table Talk (Melbourne) Thursday 30/4/1936 -
Old World Note At Gamble- Scott Wedding - Miss Mavis Scott Wears her Grandmother's Wedding Frock of Limerick Lace
WHEN she was married to Mr Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble last Wednesday evening, Miss Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott made a very charming bride. She wore her grandmother's wedding gown of real Limerick lace, mounted on stiff rustling silk. The bodice was tightly fitting, and the sleeves were bell shaped, while the skirt had its fullness coming from the waist, which was swathed with a silk belt, embroidered with pearls. A twisted string of pearls was placed round the Juliet cap which held in place her veil of the same Limerick lace as the frock. Her 1830 posy of deep cream roses was in perfect harmony with the Early Victorian character of her ensemble. This wedding was celebrated at the Scotch College Memorial Hall, which was decorated for the occasion with cream and pink dahlias and leaves in lovely autumn hues.
The bride, who is the eldest daughter of Brigadier W. H. Scott and Mrs Scott, 82 Cramer Street, Preston, was attended by Mrs J. H. Begg as matron of honor, Miss L. Scott as bridesmaid and by two tiny trainbearers, Betty Gamble and Helen Scott.
The old-world note of the bride's gown was carried out in their frocks. Each was made of parchment taffetas with a tightly fitting bodice and a very full skirt, a twisted fichu outlined the neckline and awide sash lined with salmon pink encircled the waist. Posies of pink rosebuds were carried and wreaths of these flowers were worn in their hair.
The bridegroom, who is the elder son of Mr and Mrs H. J. Gamble, 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, had his brother, Mr Herbert Gamble, as his best man.
After the ceremony, which was solemnised by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson, a reception was held at 9 Highbury Grove, Kew. Mrs Scott, who, with her husband, received the guests, wore a frock of black velvet made with a matching cape and trimmed with silver lame. Her bouquet was of deep pink dahlias mingled with autumn leaves. Mrs Gamble chose a gown of beige cloque made on simple tailored lines. Her velvet coat was trimmed with fox furs.
. Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble lived in 1938 at Taylor Street, Malvern East, VictoriaG.1
In The Age of 14th July 1945 there is a report concerning a blaze which burnt down Russell's home in Taylor Street.
Russell's House Burns Down
Taylor Street

The British company May and Baker registered in Melbourne in 1946. Russ was to go on to be a Director for the company as it expanded in Australia. From The Herald Newspaper, MelbourneG, on 13 May 1946, p11:
"M And B" Company Registers Here
May and Baker (Australia). Pty. Ltd., chemists and druggists, registered as a "foreign" company in Victoria today, with head ofllce in
Sydney. Capital is £10,000.
Directors: Messrs F. C. Marrington and T. A. Martin. Victorian agent, H. J. R. Gamble, corner Grattan and Lygon Streets, Carlton.

It was reported on 11 December 1951 in The Age (page 6) that Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble had been appointed a Director of May and Baker Pty Ltd. He resided at 6 Gellibrand Street, at Kew, Melbourne, VictoriaG, on in October 1959. One the 30th April 1962 Bruce Stokes Wainwright, as Trustees to Herbert's Estate, sold 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, the family home, to John Morley and Patricia Shepherd for the sum of $7,000. Mr & Mrs Shepherd paid 1,000 Pound deposit and paid the balance at the rate of 10 Pound per week "which shall include interest" until the 15th June 1969 when the ballance became due. The interest was 7%. Hugh appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1963 and listed as living at 6 Gellibrand Street, Kew, MelbourneG.
Hugh died on 15 July 1967 at Kew, Melbourne, VictoriaG, at age 56. He was cremated on 18 July 1967 at Springvale Botanical Cemetery, Melbourne, VictoriaG.2

Family

Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott b. 25 Apr 1913, d. 24 Mar 2008

Citations

  1. [S283] Directory, Victorian (Sands), 1938, p 1369.
  2. [S226] Springvale botanical cemetery; Gamble, Hugh Joseph Russell; Cremated, 18/07/1967;
    The cremated remains have been collected.

Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott

F, b. 25 April 1913, d. 24 March 2008
FatherBrig. William Henry Scott CMG DSO b. 11 Apr 1881, d. 21 Sep 1960
MotherRosamond Maplesden Carter b. 9 Sep 1889, d. 5 Jan 1940
ChartsCairns, John - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Craw (Crow), James - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Gamble, John - Descendants Chart (Indented)
Last Edited19 Oct 2018
     Mavis was born on 25 April 1913 at Wangaratta, VictoriaG.
# Newspaper Photo - Table Talk (Melbourne) Thursday 26/11/1931 -
Miss Mavis Scott, eldest daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. W. H. Scott, who was a debutante at the United Service Institution Ball, held at the Plaza, St. Kilda, recently.

She married Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble on 22 April 1936.
Newspaper Article - The Argus (Melbourne) Thursday 23/4/1936 -
Gamble—Scott
A charming wedding took place at the Scotch College Chapel last night, when Mavis Maplesden Balfour, eldest daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. W. H. Scott, of 82 Cromer Street, Preston, was married to H. J. Russell, elder son of Mr. and Mrs.W. J. Gamble, of 483 Neerim road, Murrumbeena, by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson.
The bride made a most attractive picture in her gown of Limerick lace mountedon stiff silk, which had been worn by her grandmother on her wedding day.
The close-fitting bodice had pretty bell sleeves, and the very full skirt fell into a train at the back. A tulle cap encircled with pearls was worn on her head and a veil of Limerick lace flowed from the nape of her neck.
The bride, who was given away by her father, was attended by her cousin, Mrs.J. H. Begg, her sister, Miss Lorraine Scott,and by two small girls—Betty Gamble and Helen Scott. They were dressed alike in picturesque frocks of parchment coloured taffeta, with pleated fichus edgingthe bodices, and full graceful skirts. Salmon-pink roses were worn on their dresses and the same flowers formed their becoming wreaths. The two little girls carried baskets of roses, and the two older attendants held period posies of roses. The bridegroom's brother, Mr. Herbert Gamble, acted as best man. After the ceremony a reception was held at 9 Highbury grove, Kew.
Newspaper Article - Table Talk (Melbourne) Thursday 30/4/1936 -
Old World Note At Gamble- Scott Wedding - Miss Mavis Scott Wears her Grandmother's Wedding Frock of Limerick Lace
WHEN she was married to Mr Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble last Wednesday evening, Miss Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott made a very charming bride. She wore her grandmother's wedding gown of real Limerick lace, mounted on stiff rustling silk. The bodice was tightly fitting, and the sleeves were bell shaped, while the skirt had its fullness coming from the waist, which was swathed with a silk belt, embroidered with pearls. A twisted string of pearls was placed round the Juliet cap which held in place her veil of the same Limerick lace as the frock. Her 1830 posy of deep cream roses was in perfect harmony with the Early Victorian character of her ensemble. This wedding was celebrated at the Scotch College Memorial Hall, which was decorated for the occasion with cream and pink dahlias and leaves in lovely autumn hues.
The bride, who is the eldest daughter of Brigadier W. H. Scott and Mrs Scott, 82 Cramer Street, Preston, was attended by Mrs J. H. Begg as matron of honor, Miss L. Scott as bridesmaid and by two tiny trainbearers, Betty Gamble and Helen Scott.
The old-world note of the bride's gown was carried out in their frocks. Each was made of parchment taffetas with a tightly fitting bodice and a very full skirt, a twisted fichu outlined the neckline and awide sash lined with salmon pink encircled the waist. Posies of pink rosebuds were carried and wreaths of these flowers were worn in their hair.
The bridegroom, who is the elder son of Mr and Mrs H. J. Gamble, 483 Neerim Road, Murrumbeena, had his brother, Mr Herbert Gamble, as his best man.
After the ceremony, which was solemnised by the Rev. A. Irving Davidson, a reception was held at 9 Highbury Grove, Kew. Mrs Scott, who, with her husband, received the guests, wore a frock of black velvet made with a matching cape and trimmed with silver lame. Her bouquet was of deep pink dahlias mingled with autumn leaves. Mrs Gamble chose a gown of beige cloque made on simple tailored lines. Her velvet coat was trimmed with fox furs.
. As of 22 April 1936,her married name was Gamble.
Mavis appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1937 and listed as living at 4 Taylor Street, East Malvern, MelbourneG. Mavis appeared on the Australian electoral roll of 1963 and listed as living at 6 Gellibrand Street, Kew, MelbourneG. Mavis had a listed occupation of Home Duties and he of Director.
Mavis Maplesden Balfour Scott died on 24 March 2008 at Melbourne, AustraliaG, at age 94. She was cremated The cremated remains have been collected. on 28 March 2008.1

Family

Hugh Joseph Russell Gamble b. 7 May 1911, d. 15 Jul 1967

Citations

  1. [S226]

Susanna Beer

F, b. 18 May 1834, d. 15 October 1837
FatherJames Beer b. 2 May 1809, d. 27 Nov 1877
MotherSusanna Follett b. 23 Feb 1813, d. 19 Jul 1862
ChartsFollett, John - Descendants (Indented)
Last Edited16 Apr 2020
     Susanna was born on 18 May 1834 at West Teignmouth, Devon, EnglandG. Her father, James Beer, is recorded as being a "Whitesmith" at this time..1
Susanna died on 15 October 1837 at St.Paul at Exeter, Devon, EnglandG, at age 3.

Citations

  1. [S312] Plymouth & West Devon Record Office, Devon Baptisms.

James John Beer

M, b. 25 January 1836, d. 24 December 1903
FatherJames Beer b. 2 May 1809, d. 27 Nov 1877
MotherSusanna Follett b. 23 Feb 1813, d. 19 Jul 1862
ChartsClark, William - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Follett, John - Descendants (Indented)
Last Edited13 Aug 2020
     James was born St Pauls on 25 January 1836 at Exeter, Devon, EnglandG. He immigrated with his parents James Beer and Susanna Follett on 24 September 1839 at Port Adelaide, South AustraliaG; aboard the "Recovery" with his wife, son and daughter, four months after leaving London.

He married Eleanor Clark on 11 March 1856 at Adelaide, South AustraliaG. Extract from "THYRA DISTRICT CENTENARY" booklet published 1976.
Among the pioneers of the district was James John Beer who selected land in August 1876. Coming from Devon, England, as a boy, he sailed with his family from Plymouth; the name which he was to give his selection at Bunnaloo.
They originally settled at Adelaide, S.A., where James' father, a blacksmith, performed work on the stripper which was to revolutionise the wheat industry. James travelled to Victoria during the gold rush and farmed at Tabilk and Tylden. He married Elenor Clark, members of whose family selected land adjoining at Bunnaloo. We are told that scrub was so thick at the time that the women tied pieces of cloth to it to enable them to find their way between the homes which were only half a mile apart. Odd plants of this scrub persist on the property today.
James John Beer and Elenor Clark were married in Adelaide in 1856, and their first child, Lucy, was born there the following year. James John and Elenor moved to Victoria with the rest of their families, and they were living at Tylden when their second child was born in 1859.
While they were living at Tylden, the Beers were involved in the Wesleyan Church, for who James John acted as a local preacher. In 1873 James John and Elenor purchased land at Tabilk, where their eighth and last child was born, but she lived for less than three months. It was while they were at Tabilk that their son Henry Alfred contracted typhoid fever and died in 1875.
After James John and his son Albert, selected land at Bunnaloo on the 31 August 1876, the Beer and Clark families moved to NSW. John Clark had also selected land at Bunnaloo. James John named his property "Plymouth", after his place of birth and the port in England, from which he had sailed as a small child.
The Beers were soon involved in district affairs, especially the Bible Christian Church, for whom James John served as a lay preacher. The Beers opened their home as a meeting place, and James John rode or walked many miles to conduct services.
In a letter, dated 4 September 1879, to the Council of Education, the residents of Bunnaloo/Thyra requested that the teacher, who had been conducting a private school in the district, be appointed to the first Government school which was about to be opened. Jas J.Beer was one of the signatories to the letter.
When Elenor's health began to decline, James John decided to move back to a cooler climate of Kyneton. They were living in Urquhart Street, Castlemaine, when Elenor died on the 3 October 1895. She was buried at the Campbells Creek Cemetery. James John returned to live with his family at Bunnaloo and Echuca, moving from one to another. On the 19 July 1899, he purchased the S.S. Elizabeth and a barge for £400.
James John was at his son Rupert's home in High Street, Echuca, when he died on the 24 December 1903. He was buried in the Moama Cemetery.1 He witnessed an unknown person 's burial on 23 August 1884 at Moama Cemetery, Moama, New South WalesG. James was employed.
James died on 24 December 1903 at High Street at Echuca, VictoriaG, of Bright's Disease at age 67. Extract from "Echuca and Moama advertiser Tuesday, December 1903"


OBITUARY

Mr J. J. BEER

Just before midnight on Christmas eve Mr James J Beer, father of our highly respected townsman, Mr R E Beer, passed quietly away after an illness extending over six months, the last two months being confined to his bed. The end had been anticipated for some time, the sufferer having been under Drs, Eking and Kelly for treatment of Bright's disease. The deceased gentleman was a colonist of 64 years, being one of the pioneers of South Australia. He was born in Devonshire, England and sailed with his parents for Australia when three years old. The family landed in Adelaide, which was then only a few canvas tents, and his father, a lock land bright-smith by trade, finding no opening in "canvas town" for such a trade, turned his attention to the blacksmithing business, which he followed with varying success for many years, and his young and only son, James assisted in the business from the time he was old enough to stand on a box to blow the bellows. He claims later on to have made the ironwork for the first successful stripper that ever worked in South Australia, or any other part of the world. This machine was pushed from behind by two bullocks. A good deal of their trade at that time consisted of shoeing, or, as they called it, "cuing" bullocks. As a child, with his parents, he witnessed the landing of the first horse in Adelaide. He was amongst the few at the time of memorable famine in Adelaide, and his father often told the story of the first flour miller coming to him and buying a bag of shrivelled wheat that had been kept for fowls feed, and paying him one guinea per bushel for it, and getting up steam at the mill for the express purpose of grinding that one bag of wheat. A ship laden with flour arrived at port just in time to save the people from starvation. Later on Mr Beer, with his father, uncle and cousin, came over to Victoria, overland, via 90 mile desert, with two bullocks in a dray, and tried their luck for some time on the Fryer's Creek diggings, after which he bought land in Clover's Forest (Tylden) Kyneton district, where they combined farming with their old business, blacksmithing. It is also said that Mr Jas. J Beer bought the first back delivery reaping machine ever delivered in Victoria. Mr Beer and his father also bought a steam threshing machine with which they were very successful in the early Goulburn and Kyneton districts. During his 15 years residence in Tylden he was connected with the Wesleyan denomination and a local preacher, taking as many as 20 services during some quarters and riding and sometimes walking many miles to conduct services. He used to go and take his appointment whether it rained or shined, as he said it was better for him to go and be disappointed at there being no congregation than for the congregation to go and be disappointed at there being no preacher. He then had the satisfaction that he had done his duty, whether the people came in the rain to hear him or not, and thus in that wet climate he had many long cold and wet rides, which he did cheerfully for the Master's cause. He went from Tylden to Tabilk, where he lived for three years and was on the preachers' plan again of the Wesleyan Church, after which he came and selected ground at Bunaloo, NSW, about 30 years ago, being on e of the first to settle in that district. He threw his house open for religious services and started preaching the Gospel all over that district holding services alternately in different houses in the district. Soon after the Bible Christian denomination opened up what is now known as the Wamboota circuit, and Mr Beer joined that church, and was actively engaged in the work for about 12 years, being circuit steward up to the time he left the district and went to Kyneton with his late wife for the benefit of her health, where he again joined the Wesleyan Church and was on the plan as local preacher for several years. Leaving there, he went to Castlemaine, where he lived until his wife died - 8 years ago. Since that time he had been living alternately with his married sons and daughters. He was closely connected with the local Bible Christian Church until the Methodist union took place, and he then threw in his lot with the united Methodists, with whom he was associated up to the time of his death. He was a local preacher up to about a year ago, when he had to abandon the work owing to the failure of his health. He was an active member of the Christian Endeavour Society, in which he took great interest, and it was a cause for great regret to him when his health broke down, rendering him unable to attend the meetings. By his kind and homely manner he gained for himself the highest esteem of all, both young and old, with whom he came in contact. He never entered upon public life outside the church, preferring rather to live a quiet, humble life. He will be greatly missed in church circles, as he was looked upon as a man with a great deal of experience in church matters. His age at the time of his death was 67 years and 11 months. He leaves a grown up family of two daughters and four sons to mourn their loss, who recognise that they have in him lost a good father and a wise counsellor.
. His body was interred on 26 December 1903 at Moama Cemetery, Moama, New South WalesG.

Family

Eleanor Clark b. 6 Nov 1835, d. 3 Oct 1895
Children

Citations

  1. [S63] Durrant, Not All Beer & Skittles , p5.

William Clark

M, b. 19 October 1834, d. 22 November 1874
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
ChartsClark, William - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Last Edited11 Jun 2000
     He was christened on 19 October 1834 at Heage, Derby, EnglandG. William was born on 19 October 1834 at Heage, Derby, EnglandG. He immigrated with his parents John Clark and Mary Anne Slater on 6 June 1849 at Port Adelaide, South AustraliaG; The Dorothy, a ship of 488 tons, had originally left Plymouth on 4th Mar before reaching Port Adelaide. John and family travelled this distance as steerage passengers before leaving the ship in Adelaide. From here the Dorothy left for Melbourne arriving there on July 29 after leaving Adelaide on the 21st.
The South Australian Register on Sat 9th June 1849, p4: "Wednesday, June 6 The barque Dorothy, 488 tons, Moody, master, from London. Passengers— Mr Jonas M Myers, Mr Richard Baker Aldersey, wife. and seven children, Mr William Montgomery, wife, and three children. Mr John Rule, Miss Sarah Rule, in the cabin.
Messrs John Joseph Hail, Richard Pirkins, John Moseler Smith, Miss Ellen Scott, Mr William Stewart, in the intermediate. Richard Wm. Lerrett, wife, and two children. John Archer, wife, and child, Wm. Barnes and wife, Henry Rugless, wife, and two children, Henry S Rugless and wife, George Lee and wife, Thomas Goodman, Maria Williams and son, Patrick Gallaway, wife, and three children. James William Bailey, John Robertson, Thos Hitherington, Eliza Barnett, Philip Larritt. William Mason, wife, and child, Robert Torlmer, wife, and two children (Walter, aged I6 years, was drowned at sea, 2nd June). William Brewer, wife, and child, James Brown and wife, Margaret Humbut, Elizabeth Fisher, James Hawkins and two children, John Turner, wife, and five children, Charles Swift, wife, and four children, John Clarse [Clark]. wife, and seven children, Eleanor Slater [nee Frith], Mary Raw Hs. Joseph Fogg. Charles George Webb, Mary Ann Kerby, Geo Diggins. John Grummedge, Harstham Hogg, George Peter Hammond, wife, and three children. Jane Barnes, Thomas Thacker, John Rawson. Thomas Tyler, wife, and eight children, John Stock, John Symes Avery, in the steerage."1

He married Jane Maria Cocking on 31 January 1855 at Brighton, South AustraliaG.
William died on 22 November 1874 at Baynton, VictoriaG, fractured skull at age 40.

Family

Jane Maria Cocking b. 10 Jan 1836, d. 1897
Children

Citations

  1. [S99] Text , "SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE." South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900) 9 June 1849: p4. Web. 22 Dec 2018 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50246245>.

Samuel Clark

M, b. 1842, d. 11 January 1915
FatherJohn Clark b. 27 Jun 1812, d. 22 Aug 1884
MotherMary Anne Slater b. 1813, d. 25 Sep 1887
ChartsClark, William - Descendant Chart (Indented)
Last Edited26 Nov 2019
     Samuel was born in 1842 at Derbyshire, EnglandG. He was baptized on 17 December 1843 at Anglican service, Heage, Derby, EnglandG.1
He married Mary Ryan at VictoriaG.
Samuel Clark died on 11 January 1915 at Wanalta, VictoriaG. He died at age 75 years from Chronic disease of the lungs and heart apnea which had been suffering for at least 1 year.2 He was buried on 11 January 1915 at Colbinabbin Cemetery, VictoriaG.

Family

Mary Ryan
Children

Citations

  1. [S314] Index (c) IRI. Used by permission of FamilySearch Intl, Derby Birtha and Baptisms, Samuel Clark, Baptism, 17 Dec 1843.
  2. [S196] Australian Certificate. Samuel Clark; Reg Vic No: 2988 (D).